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33

Making all character models the same size has a lot of benefits when doing poses and animations. Imagine, for example, a sit-down-on-chair animation. A character with longer legs has a different sitting pose than one with shorter legs. Or a character grabbing something. When the characters have different heights, their hands will be on different positions ...


29

You do not give deep details about what you already have, but starting on an empty canvas, I would say that intelligence shall be used to determine the complexity of the spells being able to be cast by the wizard, while strength may be used to determine the number of spells being able to be cast by unit of time. This way, an intelligent but weak wizard, may ...


19

One way I can think of to make strength important to a mage, would be to have strength decide the maximum weight a player can carry, and have some (or all?) Spells require reagents that take space and consume weight. Or make a heavy staff necessary to cast the more powerful spells, which you can only wield if you're strong enough. That way, if you want to ...


17

Assuming the skill development is deterministic and fairly linear, all you need to do is to hook into some kind of real time clock (such as the system clock, or server clock), and calculate how long the skill has been in development. In other words, when the skill development starts, take timestamp and store it, and whenever you want to check if the skill ...


17

Game characters are usually animated using a technique called skeletal animation: (Image source: Valve Software) Each 3d model has an invisible bone structure (the red and teal lines in the image above). Each polygon of the model is connected to a bone. When you define a motion sequence, you define it as a sequence of rotations of the bones around their ...


15

Casting requires mental discipline but also requires large amounts of energy to flow through the body. Holding the body in the right position and directing the flow with precision requires physical strength to hold the arms and the head and the fingers just "so" while huge energies are flowing through them. If your muscles are not strong you have to take it ...


13

I tried it. Brown is generated hair. The red circle is the hairbrush. The hairstyles were achieved by brushing the hair with the hairbrush. Here's how that works: The Hair Hairs are like this: Bendy. Like a bezier curve. Quadratic ones are pretty simple. Finite. They start and end somewhere. They also have some fixed length. Coloured. They've got ...


13

The elements you can use to present emotions I can think of are: Visual character animations (walking upright, bowed or hobbling, arms near the body when cold) especially facial expressions textures or decals (injury, blood, scratches) particles (sweat, blood) Gameplay player abilities (movement speed, jumps, reaction time, attack strength) body ...


13

Get rid of Strength Just because every other CRPG since the inception of computer games has ripped off D&D's original poorly-conceived attribute system doesn't mean that you have to as well. You can fix the issue of Strength being useless for casters by simply not having Strength. Or don't have it for casters. Some alternative stat concepts that ...


11

Some random things I remember reading and have worked for me: a character should be recognisable from just their silhouette. Each character in a group should have their own colour scheme. Simply-drawn characters are more easy for the player to relate to, because they are less specifically one person, and more of a vessel for the player/reader/viewer to ...


11

This is not legal advice because I am not a lawyer, you should consider talking to a real lawyer if you want a proper answer to any law-related topic. You can't use the assets that ship with Minecraft. You can, however, create your own box-man avatar, and that would probably be a much better idea for a variety of reasons even disregarding the legal or ...


11

Your question inspired me to play around with the RUBE editor to find a nice solution. Here's what I came up with: Setup 1 Let's start with the simpler one on the left. It has the following setup (from the bottom up): A wheel body that can roll back and forth A small box (chassis) attached to the wheel via a revolute joint. The chassis body is not ...


9

I'll take a stab at this but first a couple of comments: "The more stats, the more complex and detailed your character becomes. If you mean complex and detailed in the sense that you've got more numbers in flight, sure. If you mean complex in terms of "Hey, my character is a nuanced being with a unique story!", eh. This especially falls short when ...


9

I ran across a (now defunct) site a while ago, and there were a series of posts about this topic. In part 1, the author talks about the basic formulas, and how different stats equate to damage, health, MP, and so on. Part 2 is much smaller, and all you really need is to grab the word doc he links to in the post. It is a small document that goes deeper ...


9

I would try to look at hybrids from a different angle. You seem to trying to make a hybrid class fill two different roles. Instead try to make a class fill a single role with the tools of other classes. Lets do an example with amonk. Monks are classic healer-fighters, or a priest-warrior hybrid. If you just give a warrior the ability to heal like a priest ...


8

You should always have an element that people can relate with. Take for example Fry from Futurama. His main purpose is to be the connection from the 20th century to the 30th century, and without him the viewer would not make much sense from the show. This same mentality should be used with game characters, since they often live in environments that do not ...


8

I'd like to second what Olafur and Iain said, but to add a comment to Iain's fourth point. Characters can speak, and they can speak a lot, as long as you make sure that their dialouge builds the story, and that story is engaging. A good example of this in a 'male-oriented' game that still really appeals to me as a female, would be Red Dead Redemption. ...


7

Like with just about any skill, like math, the answer is no, it's not required, but it helps. So how do you cope with it? You find someone who has the skills required to help you. Or design something that does not require said skills, like in this case, a 2d game.


7

Characters in videogames are strongly defined by what they do, particularly player characters. Lara Croft jumps, grabs, swims, and shoots. Mario's original name is "Jumpman." Megaman bosses are defined by their attacks. In other media, other qualities may come to the fore, such as character history, personality, perspective on life, or inner conflict. For ...


7

If you don't have a good reason for otherwise, then the player always chooses.


7

The problem with this approach is in this statement - "Add some more random chars, emulating new players" The task of randomly generating every permutation of character builds is trivial compared to making the AI that would actually use that build appropriately. It would be extremely difficult to tell the difference between a poor build and a poor AI in ...


7

IANAL, and it would potentially be different in different countries, but some guidelines: Anything that references trademarked and/or copyrighted content (and everything is copyrighted at the moment of creation by its creator) should not be used without explicit permission from the trademark/copyright owner. When in doubt about trademark or copyright ...


7

"Idle action" or "idle animation." I don't think there's really standard, but those are very common terms. However, it seems like some games/animation frameworks, like the one used by StarCraft 2, differentiate between commonly played animations ("idle animation") and less common animations only played from time to time ("fidget animation"). In the end it ...


6

Gamasutra. "It Builds Character: Character Development Techniques in Games" by Rafael Chandler Inspiring technique to create interesting Game Characters using Tarot Deck. "Creating Emotion in Games: The Craft and Art of Emotioneering" By David Freeman (ISBN : 1-5927-3007-8): Chapter 2.1. Emotioneering Techniques Category #1: NPC Interesting Techniques ...


6

Yep, an animator creates each animation (falling, walking, idle) in a specialized program, as well as intermediary states between those (idle to combat ready, starting to walk, stopping). A finite state machine is used to describe what animation states can lead to which seamlessly - this can be implemented by the game engine or not. Modern engines can ...


6

Normally when I approach character design I work on the character model first, once I have a good starting point I start to add "bones" and "weighting" for the "skin" of the model. You mentioned a skeleton, and in this regards I believe that these are the same. The bones act as the handles that you grab to control shaping the model. I start from the head ...


6

My feeling is it would be easier to fake it than do it with full physics. If your bugs can be animated, give them an animation of leaping up in the air, rotating, then landing. You know that sooner or later any physics based method is going to be (heh) buggy. Bug on a slope, object in its way, etc.


6

You have some basic possibilities: If the player disconnects, the character vanishes as well. Usually, you'd want this vanishing to not happen instantaneously. If players could just "pull the plug" whenever they are in a dangerous situation, they will do it and they will devise strategies to beat areas too hard for them by logging in and out like a madman. ...


6

I don't think you can prove that "having a female protagonist actually affect sales, in particular, for small indie games?" And I don't think the sex of the lead character will deter people from buying games. Allow me to explain. The article where an investor said he would not invest in a game with a female lead "You can't have a female character in ...


6

The answer by danijar already has some good ideas, but I have another one. Unless you want to go for a silent protagonist, you could have the player-character monologue about feelings of discomfort. First just occasionally ("I could need a snack right now") and then more frequent and demanding ("Hunger! I'm starving! Food! Please!"). The player will feel ...



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