Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

31

I have asked such a question when I joined GD. Here are some links that might be of interest to you which I hope will guide you toward your objective. In short, I would go with XNA Game Studio to get a grip on game development. Then, moving forward to what you wish to achieve as knowledge/technology. XNA taught me about working with sprites, and allowed me ...


29

You've already started so keep learning programming. Don't only learn about game programming, but work on some game projects. Don't tell your judgmental relatives that you're learning to make games, just tell them you're learning to program computers. Then when you graduate go work in a discipline of your choosing, maybe games or maybe not. So it would ...


28

This of course is dependent on the individual developer and what goals they want to accomplish. But I think the only real measure is the development of games! In my opinion, the path of a game developer closely follows the development of their first game. But then what are the milestones for a game? There are simple enough games that they could be created in ...


27

Create games. Can't stress that enough. Even if they are small prototype fun things or small finished games. If you are applying for a programmer job, show your skill in that area by doing a well programmed game. The graphics do not need to be good.


27

Speaking very broadly, there are two sorts of skills: "I can make this thing shiny by clicking that button." This is Unity-domain knowledge; it's something you've learned about how to use Unity, and probably won't help you much when learning another system's interface. (While that other system is likely to have some way to make an object shiny, it will ...


22

The first question is where are you looking? If you are interested in a particular studio, outside of industry sites the best place to find jobs for the studios is on their own site. In my experience (from just looking around, speaking to people) the industry has no shortage of applicants. Because of that, there is no real need to expend extra resources ...


21

A lot of people say you barely make money in videogame jobs Pretty much all game programmers I know here in the UK earn more than the national median wage. There are no starving employed game programmers. Is there anyone here who develops indie games and can vouch for ANY money making? That's quite a different proposition. Thousands of people want ...


19

I don't think the answer to this question is any different than any other business related field. Will I survive? How am I supposed to know? Have you actually tried making games before? Do you actually like making games? Are you any good at what you do? Do you know the right people to help you get to where you want to be? Do you know the right people ...


16

I do not think it would harm your chances. C# is becoming more popular, especially with XNA and SlimDX. I have used both C# and C++, and I must say I preferred XNA significantly. It was just cleaner to work with, but not so much that it felt like you weren't doing anything. For the career part, you would want to mention that you're used to XNA, though I ...


15

Here is an analogy that may fit your situation: I'm a very good story teller. But my audience are Spanish speakers and I only have very basic Spanish speaking skills. That's the situation you're in. You are very good at one of the core concepts required for graphics/physics/AI programming. But you don't know the language (programming). If you don't ...


13

Objective-C is the language of choice to develop for iOS. But you can also include plain C or C++ Code in there, so you could write large portions of your code in these languages. XCode and MacOS-X provide you with all tools needed to develop such Apps. There's (currently) no easy way to develop iOS Apps on Windows, except maybe a Virtual-Machine or trying ...


13

Don't write a demo for an interview if you can avoid it; submit existing code or projects if you can. Demos and code samples are important for a lot of reasons (which vary by reviewer), but mostly they are about showing potential employers the kind of code you write in the wild and the kind of problems you are interested in solving. They also help ...


13

You don't see game development positions on general programming job sites because good candidates don't come from there. With few exceptions (web/database guys, for one), game programming is such a different beast than the majority of programming jobs out there. And "game programmer" is one of those "sexy" titles that has a lot of casual people throwing ...


13

This is mostly an unanswerable question, but I'll go through some of the things you mention. You don't have any useful skills to bring to the table - sorry to be blunt - so you basically have to bankroll the enterprise if you want anybody to take you seriously. Your main cost is the people you need to employ. Unless you know what sort of game you're going ...


12

You definitely can make money doing indie games. I myself am a co-owner of an indie game startup, and I'm definitely not in danger of starving. :) There are two things to consider. First, indie games are risky, as is any startup. You need funds to get started, there's a high chance of failure for any of a hundred different reasons, and if you try to ...


12

Do people hire people based on their math knowledge alone? Math is very useful to game developers (programmers developing physics algorithms, designers analyzing stats, etc.) but game companies don't hire mathematicians.


10

It has been my experience that the same concepts used in XNA transfer back and forth between different libraries and languages. I've been able to effectively hop back and forth between different game technologies, and I started out with XNA. Working with C# and XNA helped keep me focused on one specific learning goal ("What makes a game tick?") as opposed ...


10

I'm not a tester but I've worked on teams with them, and had students enter the industry as testers. Up sides: Yes, it is a "relatively" easy way to get a job. Key word: relative. Testing jobs are still competitive. You're one of the few people on the development team that can actually say you play games for a living. It's a (false) foot in the door. ...


10

Financial planning is outside the scope of this site, and there isn't really enough information to help you with that side of things. That question is something you're going to have to answer yourself. And on top of that, I would say that in order to really answer that question you would have to provide links to your games so we can look at them and see ...


10

If you're sure that's the direction you want to take your career, I wonder why you haven't done a simple game or demo. As a developer, I had been making simple games, demos and experiments since I was 5 until I was 22 and finally started my company. When hiring people, not having anything to show was a red flag for me. Please don't take this the wrong way, ...


10

Volunteer playtesting is usually just a few hours of watching you over your shoulder (or at the really fancy places, through cameras and one way mirrors) to see what you do when you're exposed to something you haven't seen before so they can see where frustrations lie or what you're inclined to do given a certain situation. They might ask you to fill out a ...


10

Frequently coders are called upon to figure out if designs are possible, and also help order new features in schedules, but when it comes to actively providing creative input, each company varies wildly. Some don't have many dedicated designers and the coders are meant to "add value" while developing the features. In other companies there is a very strict ...


10

The Win32 API is not a must. Professional games can be developed in anything from AGS to Flash to XNA to low-level C++. The Win32 API is only used for some Windows games, and not at all on non-Windows systems. I will note, however, that a skilled general-purpose game developer would be able to pick up the Win32 API and learn how to use it if it was the best ...


10

They have those Entry Requirements for programmers (typos included): Object-orientated programming skills, preferably C++ Experience working with Windows, Mac OS or Linux API's Degree in Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics or related discipline is desired but not essential. we'd like to see a real time demo and the its source code You ...


10

By no means I am experienced with big game development, but I like the game team roles description as given by Jason Gregory in the Game Engine Architecture, because it is broad enough to hold true most of the time: Engineers (from runtime to tools) Artists (from concept, throught 3D and writing all the way to sound) Designers (gameplay, ...


9

iPhone development is a bit of a minefield for indie development. Unless you can catch a ride on the hype train, your game is unlikely to get anywhere; there is just too much competition. My advice would be; focus on making a few great games rather than a bunch of decent ones, and talk about your games as much as possible. Send emails to TechCrunch, ...


9

I've been in development for 30+ years, and was QA for about 15 of that (also QA manager, and director of engineering, hiring both QA and developers.) If you can get a QA job -- if you have tenacity, attention to detail, and can reliably show up for work -- then, yes, it's a fairly "easy" way to get a foot in the door. However, do NOT fall for the romantic ...


9

Not a tester, but observations as a developer for big and small companies Did the game tester position lead to other more desirable positions? Sometimes, but rarely. The most common paths out of test are: tester -> test manager -> Associate Producer on the dev team. tester -> lead tester -> junior designer I've seen more testers go the producer ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible