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For one, nearest-neighbor will result in pixel perfect scaling only if it's used to upscale in integer multiples. Apart from that, you should not be conducting any scaling operations on your view/projection matrices. If you set your view to match the dimensions of the screen, and your projection matrix to be orthographic with dimensions that match the ...


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You need to average the sprite pixels which are visible beneath each screen pixel. The sprite pixels can be sampled "nearest", but to move smoothly in subpixel increments on the display, you need some kind of oversampling. If you're using OpenGL, you can do this in your shader by averaging 4, or 9 or more sprite samples offset near each fragment (calculated ...


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Best solution Run an OVR Mirror and display another output window on your projector/monitor. You can attach it to one of the OVR 'eyes' if you are feeling lazy, or create a new camera and run it from there for better performance. Using networking You would run the client in 2 ways: Directly answering your question: To Remotely see everything exactly ...


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You'll want to look into pixel-art upscaling filtering algorithms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image_scaling). These have been specifically designed to upscale pixel art, having the properties of (1) retaining the original color palette (aka. no blurring) and (2) removing jaggies (aliasing that occurs due to nearest neightbour sampling). Some names of ...


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If you need to go nuts you can render the scene twice with two cameras, first with a camera set to near=100.0f far=10000.0f and then use a different depth buffer and render on top of the color buffer with another camera with near=0.01f and far=100.0f (unless you need to smoosh your character's nose into a wall closer than 1cm, that should be close enough) ...



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