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By adding or subtracting predefined attributes to individual items in the game that determine their usefulness. Most RPGs now let characters craft their own weapons and come up with personalized weaponry to a limited extent. The ability to craft ones own weapons can sometimes lead to hacks and unsupported actions by the players who find these "glitches" in ...


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I just want to reinforce the idea of allowing certain skills to work just on an specific weapon type. For instance take Vagrant Story and its Break Arts. Break Arts are skills which are tied to each specific weapon type (swords, daggers, axes, etc.), and are obtained as you use any weapon of that type. That way, Break Arts also play a role while deciding ...


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As an example, one game I'm designing is a space game. In that game, players can choose to have their ship made of materials which are particularly reflective or absorbent of electromagnetic radiation. In a simple game, there would be a clear progression from better to worse. In my game though, I made one element in which you want as much radiation reflected ...


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Based on the initial complaints you mentioned, about a lack of variance and your subsequent assumption that a slider takes care of the variance you think would work, I've just got a few things to suggest that might help, without being able to draw on a thesis of game design which really wouldnt apply here and tbh sounds like a bunch of unnessesary chaff. ...


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Not sure if this works in your game, but you could add accuracy/spread as an attribute to your guns: The farther you are removed from your target, the higher the penalty to accuracy becomes. The spread of a gun modifies this penalty (i.e. low spread weapons like rifles work effectively on long distance, while high spread weapons like shotguns are almost ...


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There are many factors that can differ between weapons. In your case, with guns and and sci-fi elements, here are a few possibilities: Area of effect. A grenade launcher, flamethrower, or machine gun can threaten multiple opponents. This isn't a good thing in enclosed spaces or where friendlies are crowded in with enemies, of course. Strength required. ...


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A problem that all game designers face Games need to engage their players. In general, a game can be broken down into two dimensions. Depth, and required knowledge. There is generally a positive relationship between depth and engagement with the players, however depth is usually accompanied by additional required knowledge. There is a mostly negative ...


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So first, I would say don't have all pistols have the same RoF etc, there probably isn't any need to keep that consistent. Have them vary slightly around an average for that weapon type. But in terms of parameters you need to make a shotgun different from an uzi and from a pistol and a sniper rifle etc. The main two parameters are obviously RoF and Damage, ...


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Beyond statistical differences, consider modifying the actual use of the different weapon types to better reflect some different playstyles. The "Feel" of a set of choices will frequently be completely tangential to the actual stats the weapons bring to the table, but can result in a much greater sense of variety. Even within choices with the exact same ...


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By giving them actual pros and cons. Damage and attack speed are one way to provide a pro/con relationship -- high damage/slow rate of fire versus low damage/high rate of fire -- for example. But that relationship can be a mathematical no-op if the resulting DPS is the same. If you put weapons out of alignment, such that the DPS is not always the same, ...


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A higher haste value doesn't necessarily have to reflect a higher amount of critical hits. Many games use two different stats for calculations - base stats, and modifiers. (D&D is a great example). Why not calculate critical hits based on the base of the haste stat, but still reflect the critical chance? For example, a level 1 character has an unmodified ...



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