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The characters do not challenge each other for supremacy. They challenge a requirement. What if both pass the requirement. Who wins? I'm surprised you haven't challenged the logic enough that you've even went to calculation with it. Either way, here are two things that might do you some good. Win chance case with advantage: IF pass bar/skill check is a ...


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The traditional approach that several answers have implicitly referenced but nobody has actually spelled out is that the task requires a fixed die roll, and add an ability modifier derived from your stats. For example, if two players follow the procedure: Roll a 14 sided die Add their modifier to the die roll and repeat until one side beats the other, ...


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Know your numbers Adding a bit to Philipp's answer, namely that rand[x] compared to rand[y] may not always produce what one expects. Below a table where we compare A to B. Both A and B have the values 1...10. We compare in two ways (note: rand() in this case generates integers, ie. rolls): rand[A] > rand[B] rand[A] ≥ rand[B] (ie. greater or equal to) ...


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Hierarchies. Feudal structures. Allow weak new players to swear allegiance to powerful established players. The overlord taxes his vassals some minor amount set by the overlord with a maximum tax rate set by the game admins; this tax rate is published to all players so that it can affect their decisions on whom to claim as overlord. This tax obligates ...


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Your mistake is using a "dice based" approach. You're on a computer you can use any system you like. Make a table that turns a difference in values into a %age chance to win and then you can set the values to absolutely anything you like, e.g. Difference (A-B) | %chance A wins -----------------|--------------- +5 or greater | 100% +4 | 95% +...


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How about this: Add a constant, e.g. 1000, to all attributes concerned. Then the relative difference becomes very small.


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The problem with your approach is that you decide the result of the combat the moment you decide on the main stat. When you have 4 main stats, and the fighter is only better in one of them, their win-chance is always 1 in 4, no matter how large the differences actually are. When you want more fine-grained results, you need more fine-grained randomness. ...


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There's two big things. First, remember you are on a computer. You can make any system you want. No need to limit yourself to a d20 roll, though this is easy to comprehend for players. Things like rolling 6 d6 dice are easy on a computer and they give far less random results. Second, looking at other systems like D&D it is obvious that they simply ...


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This is a pretty deep question, honestly, from a game mechanics standpoint. But there are a few things that might help. First, this is why most games have a separate component for hit and damage, where there's a "roll" to see if you hit for damage, then a "roll" against a damage table or range for the given character. This also leads to some standard ...



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