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11

This is not legal advice because I am not a lawyer, you should consider talking to a real lawyer if you want a proper answer to any law-related topic. You can't use the assets that ship with Minecraft. You can, however, create your own box-man avatar, and that would probably be a much better idea for a variety of reasons even disregarding the legal or ...


9

To do this effectively without 'generating all possible options,' you're going to want to use a layering approach... at least in theory, even if in practice you eventually collapse the layered textures to a single sprite for draw-call reduction, which I think you should and will detail later. The layering approach involves having a sprite set for all your ...


5

Unity has an example project with this already implemented for you: http://unity3d.com/support/resources/example-projects/charactercustomization On that page it says "feel free to use the code and artwork for your own Unity productions", which would likely reduce the workload significantly (since it's already done for you!)


4

First off, I totally agree with Josh Petrie's answer, you should have your own models. But in this kind of case there is an obvious solution that people seems to forget or doesn't want to consider... You can ask the owner the right to use its work... explains how you would like to use it, what you need exactly etc... don't be too greedy, but if you don't ...


3

There's a couple of nice resources. Try Reiner's tilesets: http://reinerstileset.4players.de/englisch.html This is a terrific set of sprites. All were created originally with a 3D modeler, and then cut into 2D images. Many images have multiple animations from multiple viewpoints. Most of the images are in a traditional RPG theme, but there's a good chance ...


3

Right now, you are mapping avatars to characters. The first thing I would do is flip that around. In my game, I have the following: Every object that has to updated and rendered (e.g. Enemy, Player) is a GameObject. A GameObject holds different modules, like one for rendering, one for collision detection, etc. Each child of GameObject holds state unique to ...


2

If you really need that many avatars I would look into combinations (like police does when making faces of suspects). Have 3-4 face shapes/colors, 3-4 colors of eyes, 3-4 shapes mouths and noses, ears, etc.. Maybe some more distinct features (eyepatch, cigar, scar). However this way will require additional effort to hide the fact that they are stitched from ...


2

It would have to be done by the CPU- a geometry shader doesn't give the opportunity to save it's results, which would be essential, and not all devices supported by those games support geometry shaders. Achieving it could be as simple as applying a scale matrix to the whole or separate parts. Edit: I read your related question. You should really clarify ...


2

In a general sense, the engines like Unreal or Unity provide you a way to get your assets on the screen. They may have tools for mashing up a bunch of assets, but you still need a program like Maya, 3D Studio Max, or Blender to build the assets you're going to be mashing up. Specifically, to answer your question on effort: the effort required is probably ...



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