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34

The following result are calculated for lip synchronization which is concidered to be "the most noticeable a/v sync error". Wikipedia says For television applications, audio should lead video by no more than 15 milliseconds and audio should lag video by no more than 45 milliseconds. For film, acceptable lip sync is considered to be no more than 22 ...


22

The term you're looking for is signal processing/analysis There are lots of techniques involved but the fundamental one that those games make use of is Beat Detection. This tries to calculate the tempo of the song and where the beats in a measure are and hence place the obstacles the appropriate distance apart to coincide with each beat. The way that the ...


13

We figured this out. The information is available online but it's really well hidden, so I'll post it here for good measure. Basically if the phone is tethered to a computer and the Zune software is running, it locks the media on the phone, which means that MediaPlayers in apps will never have permission to play a Song. In order to get it to work, the user ...


13

Well, if your input signal is real (as in, each sample is a real number), the spectrum will be symmetric and complex. Exploiting the symmetry, usually FFT algorithms pack the result by giving you back only the positive half of the spectrum. The real part of each band is in the even samples and the imaginary part in the odd samples. Or sometimes the real ...


12

Jonathan Blow licensed all of the music used on Braid from Magnatune.com (here's a post on his blog where he talks about it). So I was thinking that perhaps you could get an estimate of a reasonable price from their website. Here's their licensing information page and here's a sample page they provide that lets you estimate the price for licensing one song ...


11

Good sounds are generally higher pitched and more crisp than bad sounds.


11

The way I typically do that is set up animation events that are hooked up to each frame that would require a footstep sound. So in the walk animation there will typically be two steps, so at those frames I tell whatever sound system I'm using to play a random step sound. (In your case, I think it's just a regular fmod event.) Another way I've seen it done ...


11

Recording sound effects is an expensive process, and requires sound-proofing, expensive equipment and professional actors / real life objects. Game studios and Film studios generally have huge sound banks from which they take basic sounds and mix, filter, compress and generally manipulate the basic sounds to their needs. The Wilhelm Scream is a great ...


10

You are using a derivative of the song, which falls under copyright. Also it doesn't matter whether you credit the original artist or not make a profit. It is still copyrighted.


10

As always, it depends. Audio is a very complex topic, and the details can be vastly different from API to API, and from system to system. Introduction to audio processing Note: for all the examples below, we will be considering linear PCM, at 44100Hz (samples per second), with 16-bit samples, and two channels (stereo). This is a very common configuration. ...


10

The audible frequency range (pitch) for humans is usually considered to be 20 to 20,000 Hz https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hearing_range Because of a phenomenon known as the Nyquist limit, you must sample at a rate at least double the frequency of the signal you want to reproduce. Note 44100 is double 22050 or slightly above the top of the human hearing ...


10

Larger sizes cost money and slow down downloads. That matters. When you have a game that has multiple music tracks compressing down lossily can save many megabytes (even gigabytes if you include audio effects, dialog, etc). Sure, your game might already be a 4GB download, but why pay for extra server bandwidth and make users wait longer for 5GB if there's ...


9

It depends on the tone of your game. If it is humoristic, you can probably go with a 'ta-daaaa!' trumpet sound for correct answers, and a 'sad trumpet' (wa-waa-waaa-waaaa) sound for incorrect answers. If the tone is more 'abstract', then a correct sound should have its pitch "going up" (like the Super Mario Coin sound), while an incorrect sound should have ...


9

I'll paraphrase my answer from Audio copyright questions (and I am Not a Lawyer :) Note that this assumes you're in the US (or other Berne signatory countries), and in particular, Canada may be different, as was discussed. It also assumes that when you say, "bought a song", you meant bought a copy from Amazon or somewhere - if you actually bought the ...


9

Ogg Vorbis is soup-to-nuts Open Source. Every bit of the Ogg Vorbis specification is available and there are no known patents that apply to Ogg Vorbis. It is often free and easy to work with. (That is, if your platform/framework of choice supports working with it. For instance, XNA/XACT don't support Vorbis, but if you are using XACT you will be giving it ...


8

While this is of dubious value with your actual situation, the best way to make small background music is to use a MOD-style format. These are formats that contain a small number of sound samples and the music in a note-by-note format, rather than a gigantic waveform that's been compressed to squeeze space out. Check out the S3M and XM formats, as well as ...


8

http://www.footagefirm.com/stock-music/all-music.html I've bought music from this group before. They often have sales for large collections (~20 tracks, with 4 variants of each track including loopable 1 minute sections) going for $8.41, or short samples (~40seconds) going for ~$5. Their collections are generally grouped by theme/atmosphere, with Scifi ...


7

G.A.N.G. and AES lecturers speak as though audio programmers are the next hot thing in games I had to Google for those terms - you might want to edit your question to be clearer about what those names mean, because I doubt most will have heard of them. Needless to say, they are bound to be a bit biased regarding their own relevance. do many studios ...


7

You could try submitting the data from the microphone to a Dynamic Sound Effect. I just wrote some code to test this, it works. DynamicSoundEffectInstance sound; protected override void Initialize() { sound = new DynamicSoundEffectInstance(Microphone.Default.SampleRate, AudioChannels.Mono); Microphone.Default.BufferReady += (a, b) => { ...


7

I took a stab at it, which was dumb because I not familiar with Fourier transforms or music theory. So, after some study I don't have a solution, but I see several troubling things: The code for the Sound and Soundbuffer is missing and could be easily be the culprit The Fourier Transforms I couldn't find the same Fourier transforms library by googling ...


7

Since you didn't mention any API for sound I'll give you the general answer. First get the distance between the audio listener and the audio source d(L,S) = sqrt((x2-x1)2 + (y2-y1)2 + (z2-z1)2) Then you define a distance where you don't want it to be audible anymore, lets say 150m If your distance is 40 meters from the source, then the volume is about ...


7

It depends of the event Feeling that, say, an explosion you see and hear is a single event will have the tolerances described in other answers - no more than ~50ms; some people may be more sensitive (e.g., amateur musicians), so I'd suggest to aim at 30ms or no more than 2 frames at 60fps. I believe that the perceived distance should affect those ...


6

Well, you usually don't have to go low level and transport the audio data to the speakers. The operating system has an interface for that (be it ALSA, DirectSound, CoreAudio, etc). Using that library, you just have to periodically give it a block of samples of a fixed length (for example, 512 samples). The sound library stores that array in an internal ...


6

Check here: http://incompetech.com/m/c/royalty-free/ Lots of different criteria to use to search by genre, feel, & keywords.


6

I'm not familiar with SharpDX but I know a bit about the native xaudio C++ API. You can't call DestroyVoice() in a callback at least in the native API which I assume StreamEnd delegate is a just a thin wrapper for OnStreamEnd() callback in the native API. A workaround may be queuing the sourceVoice to a "deleteList" in the OnStreamEnd callback and deleting ...


6

In a game, music would be the a way to play background music and sound the way to play sound effects (ej. jumping, firing, etc). Music is a special streaming channel of the Mixer. This means the file is streamed from disk in small chuncks and not loaded at once. Pygame only supports one Music at a time but you can have several Sound objects playing at ...


6

I think you are on the right track. Your proposed system of distance-based attenuation should work if you always use the in-game distance to the object from the player, which remains fixed regardless of the zoom level (don't use the "on-screen" distance, which changes as you zoom) and set up your attenuation system to begin playing an object's sounds as ...


6

It looks like this value is a measure of the physical speed of sound, and likely plays a part in the result of the simulation of the Doppler effect (if enabled). The value shown in the screenshot in the documentation is 347, which is very close to the actual speed of sound (343 meters-per-second at sea level). It doesn't appear to have anything to do with ...


5

Yeah, it's a good idea. Malham already wrote a paper on this, which was based on some comments by Menzies (back in 1999!). Also note Nosal's MASc thesis discussing using radiosity for acoustics. As for lighting, (which does 3 sets of functions, one for R, one for G, one for B) you would need to do a different "set" of SH functions for each rough frequency ...



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