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132

I work full time doing security software, and in my "free" time I work on my game. I'm not spending any money on making my game, I'm only using free software and making my own art. Don't get me wrong, I'm NOT an artist, just a programmer. It's not stopping me though. I just keep chugging away on my game, and I'll worry about making it look really pretty ...


39

Unlike other art forms, vector art requires extremely high precision, making it unsuitable for many art styles. Basic shapes and such are easy using Vector art but it's just a pain to add small details which would be really easy to paint. So its kinda restricted to very simple "symbolic" styles. For everything else painting just works better. What vector ...


35

Digital colors can be made up of three components: red, green, and blue. Combine these together, and you get final color, eg. yellow is 100% red, 100% green and 0% blue. The fourth component is, as you mentioned, transparency. Together, these form the tuple RGBA (red, green, blue, alpha) which represent an image. Now, instead of pixels, think about it ...


32

You need an art lead and proper art style documentation. There are things like palettes to determine, plus various bits of example concepts, a lot of art terminology that clearly defines things to artists in ways that tech terminology clears things up for developers. A good art lead can define all these and make your consistent art style, and properly ...


30

Vector graphics are usually more efficient than raster graphics for storage (ie. the filesize is smaller) but considerably less efficient for performance (ie. how much time it takes the computer to draw the image). In order to display an image the computer must rasterize that image (ie. calculate the pixels in the image). Since raster graphics are by ...


28

First, you want to search for tutorials on the internet. Youtube is your friend. Seriously, it's probably the best way to learn drawing. It's easy to look at some really amazing drawing and say "oh, I could never do that, he's been doing that since he was a kid." But when someone slowly walks you through the steps and explains every part of the way, the ...


27

One tip I've heard is to build as much of the game as possible before looking for artists. Build the game with placeholder art before you post about the game so that artists can get a feel for the game, its play style and environment, etc before building assets for it. They can also use the prototype to decide if it's a project they'd actually like to work ...


26

I recently discovered Allegro Sprite Editor: http://www.aseprite.org/ It's a fairly basic pixel graphics editor with animation support, but I do prefer it over Graphics Gale as ASE has proper alpha channel support and the UI is cleaner, a bit reminiscent of Deluxe Paint. It has layer support and basic onion skinning. It is an open source product, but ...


25

Interior mapping is a pretty awesome effect. It takes a boring flat quad and makes it look like a building with interiors, all entirely within the pixel shader. It's semi-procedural in that some of the assets are hand-crafted, but the shader places them procedurally.


25

To get some free artwork have a look at these other questions: Where can I find free sprites and images? Open-source 3D models easily usable in OGRE3D/jMonkeyEngine This of course probably won't look as good as artwork made specifically for your game, but you can always replace it later on. Another option is to take photos of things and use those. It's ...


22

A good question. I was experimenting with this at one point - I couldn't find a easy, pre-built solution. But let me point you to some of the resources I found when attempting to implement it myself: First of all there's an article from GPU Gems 3: Rendering Vector Art on the GPU (and the associated Loop-Blinn paper). The hardest part is that, while ...


21

The answer will vary in some cases, depending on what style of art you're looking for. There's a few options for what style of artist you have. Creation Classic hand drawn frame-by-frame animation: Probably the easiest for an artist to get into or at least it's the least technical. There are tutorials for this type of animation everywhere. It can be done ...


20

I don't know of any particular icons, but I think the most important thing to keep in mind is that players associate the colour blue with magic. Thus, I don't think the icon actually matters, as long as you follow the basic convention of red for health, blue for magic and green (or the less-used yellow) for a third metric (usually stamina, but can be other ...


19

The spikey intense orange objects are pushing in front of everything. In visual arts, distance is indicated by: Paler colors. Just changing your intense orange/rust color to be less saturated will help loads. Lighter colors. blending object's natural color with sky color or with a bland light color such as light gray or a pale sky blue. Related to ...


17

As some one who ventured a bit into the creation of art, I would really advise you to get in touch with one rather than just "buying" models. Art from different sources rarely work together (unless of course, they are meant to be) and high quality models alone won't make good graphics, everything needs to be put together with a sense of aesthetics to really ...


16

Assets like these can be created in any 3D package. They are imported into a game by pre-rendering the models at specified angles, using orthographic projection in the viewport. The pixel effect probably is a side-effect of rendering at a low resolution with little or no anti-aliasing. The spritesheets generated by these will be ordered in such a way that ...


16

Make them less sharp Implement parallax when moving the camera Add some haze Add other objects near them to give perspective on their size (like cloud caps). Add objects of known size (like trees) spreading into the distance and still in front of the mountains Add foothills around their base


15

My recommendation would be to check out Unity, as it is one of the simplest, yet deceptively powerful, engines I have run across. The engine is well documented, the community is very active and friendly, and there are a number of tutorials available to help you get up to speed. Update: Although Unity has a bit of a learning curve, I chose to recommend it ...


15

Lots and lots of practice. Most artists have been doodling and drawing since they learned how to hold a pen, you need to make up for lost time. My suggestion: start with hand drawn things and other basics. Having a grip on how a program works vs bringing out the fullest in a program for art are two different things so look up some online tutorials and the ...


15

Wow, a topic I might be able to answer some, seeing how I've been drawing my entire life (despite this there's scant evidence of it online, given that I tend to not scan my results -- I'm a very analog artist... that, and I dislike showing what I consider failures... although I suppose it would be useful for some?). Victor's answer addresses the first ...


15

Okay, so our strategy is: Make up some placeholder geometry, of roughly the right scale for the final content. That can be buildings or characters. It doesn't have to look anything like the final content, it can be boxes / spheres / etc., but it should be tessellated so that it has a decent number of polygons. If you're doing characters, make them have a ...


13

From the problems that you are having I recommend that you do the following: First, work with layers and folders. It really does help, Group individual sprites together in folders so that you can move the whole of them around and parts that are replicated should exist on seperate layers. (So if there is a sword or something it should be on a layer, eyes ...


13

I want to add a slightly different point of view from what has been previously answered. First, I disagree that gameplay is the only important thing in a game. Visuals sell, and you will most likely have your game played by other people if you show a pretty screenshot that catches their eye. Because of this, I do not recommend you disregard art, or use ...


13

You basically have three options: You can outsource it -- Tetrad's links in his comment provide a great starting point for outsourcing -- either in terms of hiring somebody to produce the art for you, or gathering it from art repositories that make their contents available for free and/or under a permissive license. You can learn to produce it yourself. ...


12

think I somewhat understand, that if I want to go 3D, I should learn some 3D modeling package really well and that would be it. Please correct me if I am wrong. I'll correct you, since you are wrong. Let's assume you want to become a writer, a good one. Do you just need to learn to read and write and type fast on keyboard and that would be it? Of course ...


12

This is the kind of question that's better answered with google. Pixel art is game art that is very restricted - you are literally using pixels to draw something, so they end up having a very boxy look. (Though a lot of pixel art now is done on a much larger scale and then made to look like it's been edited pixel by pixel.) Example: You can see in the ...


12

You shouldn't be worried if a game 'looks' like another. Take Terraria; early alpha screenshots, people were 'ZOMG IT IS A MINECRAFT CLONE'. It gets released - obviously not like Minecraft at all. Then take something like FortressCraft - that is obviously a Minecraft clone. It has the same features, pretty much. The graphics have changed, maybe. As long as ...


12

In fact, there are a number of 2d games that do use what amounts to vector art; Capcom's Ghost Trick:Phantom Detective, for instance, essentially generates its in-engine characters as vector graphics. (To be more precise, I believe they're given as flat-filled polygonal regions, which in this case amounts to the same thing). More broadly, polygonal models ...


12

Just a couple of things to add to @Marco's answer: .gif is sorely outdated. I would completely avoid using .gif files as much as possible. I think people only use them these days because of in-browser animations, and animated png's aren't well supported at this time. So all you have is jpg and png. PNG: Is lossless. The only thing you are considering ...


12

Ultimately this depends on how much of the project has been taken care of by you or other 'non artists.' Meaning that the answer if you've already built a game and need art to replace your temp graphics is different than if you've already created an engine and now wish to have someone help you write the story, create the characters and setting, and create ...



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