Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Because operations dealing with objects and their locations, such as collision detection and filtering nearby objects, are so heavily used in games, it is common practice to use one or more spatial data structures to describe your world. Some examples of these structures are grids, octrees, or the classic scene graph - a tree storing relative ...


4

Deep within the game engine your mesh is defined by your vertices, your indices (which define how to draw the triangles using the vertices), and its material (which consists of the shader as well as other parameters). Submeshes allow you to define separate lists of indices and materials (depending on the engine) over the same vertex data which is useful not ...


3

Here is my suggestions Dealing with Trees You can do any tree by using tables. It can serve as dependency counter for what ever tree you are doing. Already tested by me some time ago were skill tree, knowledge tree and my favorite, item tree. For this example we are going to use "Item" tree. Each item will be a record for the table name ItemTree. They ...


1

Every time a memorable Event (purchase1,...) happens, save it to a list. Then, serialize it to a File. If order doesn't matter, a Set would probably more performant. If order doesn't matter, but you want to reference by name, look into maps/dictionaries. Your language may not nativly supply them, but implementation is fairly easy. More indepth: Create ...


1

What you need to consider loading/creating one chunk above and below the surface in any given stack when the player is on the surface, so your generation algorithm needs to worry about stacks at the top level rather than chunks... when the player is below ground one above and below the current chunk level is fine. To clarify, a stack is a vertical column of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible