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3

You really don't have much choice. Ignoring some (IMO) terrible other options, you can either: a) couple your behavior to specific animations - so artists don't make one attack animation, they make several that your behavior plays at the appropriate times or b) have animations emit events and export state variables that game logic is driven from - ...


0

You don't have any transitions from run/walk back to jump. Look at the arrows; you only have a transition from jump to run, not back from run to jump.


0

The short answer is that you don't have an animator controller on that object (note the 'None' in the Controller slot.) The long answer is... kinda long. Read my answer here, how to setup an Animation Controller: Unable to use Maya animation with scripts when imported to Unity


0

Fig1 has the animation that you call in your code. Fig2 has an animator component but no animation, this may explain the problem. try replacing the animator with your animation you want to run then call it in the same way you do in the code related to Fig1. This is likely something not quite right with the fbx / prefab that contains it.


0

In the Animator put the 2 animations on different layers. You might have to play with the Weight and Blending options on them a bit but it should do the trick. The Unity3D documentation for the Animtation Layers resides at: http://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/AnimationLayers.html


0

The answer was here: http://answers.unity3d.com/questions/194798/scripting-animated-variables.html Animations always "take over" the control of the animated value (position / rotation / or a script value) because it always sets the value to an absolute value. However you still can affect the value but you have to decide what's the better solution ...


0

If you want to go from walk or run animation to the jump animation you have to create a specific transition for each of those. You can edit the transitions by right-clicking them and selecting edit.


2

A single animated movie could take many years to render on a single beast of a machine. Since it is pre-rendered it does not matter how much costly effects like light bounces, shadows, etc we add to the scene. These movies usually get rendered by render farms where thousands of PC's are linked together working on the same job. The reason we cannot achieve ...


3

It's worth adding that movie animation usually does a good deal of visual trickery to make perceived motion more fluid. Animators may, for instance, use traditional hand-animation techniques which are not typically used in realtime rendering, such as smears, multiples or warping to produce more fluid-looking motion despite the lower framerate which movies ...


0

don't create a empty sprite node. when you do Sprite::create(), load the first frame as the parameter. That is used to init contentSize and bounding-box variable of the sprite. So, that might help.


1

The propper way to trigger actions in certain frames of an animation is to use Animation Events. Basically, you edit the animation, adding an "event" in the last frame, and in that event you set the "Die" function to be called without any parameter. Take a look here: http://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/animeditor-AnimationEvents.html Also, using animation ...


10

What about animated movies rendering for hours and hours makes them so beautiful while in-game live rendering is less beautiful (from a general point of view)? You're assuming that the difference is simply in the render -- in an animated movie, there's also a chance for editing after the fact. They might have effects composited in that would have been ...


0

How do I build like a timer or something so that the object only gets destroyed after the animation is played Do this with a coroutine, something like: void OnTriggerEnter2D(Collider2D target) { if (target.gameObject.tag == "Deadly") { StartCoroutine(Die()); } } IEnumerator Die() { animator.SetInteger ("AnimState", 3); while ...


2

There can be a texture with the pupils and generous padding around them. On render, geometry just changes UV coords to sample from texture - hence smooth pupils movement on static geometry.


4

To answer one of the questions the OP asked in a comment: "So who should be the main culprit? Polygon level or ray tracing?" This question is more difficult than it looks. I think a good rule of thumb is the following equation (which I made up by the way): number of calculations = {polygons} * {light sources} * {effects} Basically, this means that ...


7

The other answers cover the raw graphics issues in good detail, but don't mention an important part of the realism of games vs. movies and trailers: the animations and camera movements. In a movie or trailer, each movement of people and cameras can be carefully coordinated to show just the right emotion for the moment, and they never need to be repeated. In ...


7

Adding to the other great answers that were already posted, it is worth noting that in order to achieve the fast processing times that games need, game developers need to bake many of their visual effects as simple textures. This means that great care must be taken in avoiding effect that won't bake well. One important effect that's hard to bake for video ...


36

Besides the time factor, it's worth noting that in a movie, the artist has complete control over what the viewer will and won't look at. In your typical movie scene, the camera won't spend much time pointed at the ceiling, or pointed into a dark corner of the room, or aimed at someone's ankle, so the polygon and texturing budget for those elements will be ...


93

You already mentioned one of the central points: Time. In the process behind rendering a high fidelity animation, multiple different approaches and algorithms are used (all usually combined under the term "Global Illumination"), with Ray-Tracing being one of the most common ones (others include for example Radiosity and Ambient Occlusion). Ray-Tracing ...


8

You kind of answered your own question already. Animated movies generally usually have a higher level of detail which causes a long render time for each individual frame. Games on the other hand don't have quite as much detail in them, because the scene has to be rendered 30 or more times per second. That's also why developers try to reuse as much assets ...


0

Animations like in the Minishcap that you showed as an example are generally done frame by frame because rotated body parts just would not look right at that perspective. You could experiment by drawing frame difference frames (i.e. your animation frames aren't full pictures of the character, they just show the difference between the last frame and the ...


-1

Use ccsprite with ccbadgenode in order fire number of frame of spite with moveto postion can change each frame interval with time .cccallfuntion is -(void)playStarAnimation { Animation *anim = [Animation node]; sp = [anim playAnimCCSpriteWithFileName:@"STARS~ipad" frameName:@"STARS" Layer:physicsLayer From:1 To:42 Delay:1.0/20.0 Loop:4 ...



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