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8

tl;dr func 1 1 - 2 * |(x mod 2) - 1| Or in your specific case: 1 - 2 * |((time % entireDay) - halfDay) / halfDay| You can even use a sinus wave instead (much more pretty). sin(x - pi/2) Sin Wave Or in your specific case: sin (- pi / 2 + 2 * pi * time / entireDay); Long tedious explaination in fine detail: If in military time: 00:00 ...


7

What may be a good way of simulating entities which may vary a lot is to use a force field that you draw with a marching square algorithm. So the eating entity would be a set of fields that you have moving together using a flocking strategy or similar, to get a 'cell' effect. You have to use a number of force field large enough to allow for opening a ...


5

Fluid dynamics is one of those super hard things to set up, that once you've got it working allows for a whole range of interesting effects. It's probably overkill for most games, unless you actually need things to move like a fluid (as in, flow from one point to another). For soft-body masses, I would considering instead using nets of springs to simulate ...


1

So I found it - posting the response here for future reference X/Y/Z = -7.189/0/10.136 in the Maya channel editor are rounded off values - the values themselves have a larger number of significant digits - e.g. -7.188707 so search for the first 2 decimal places only


1

For engines written by you in native code Separate your render logic out. Every cycle, run all your game / simulation logic in one phase, and once that's all complete, run all rendering logic -- this includes animation. Since rendering and animation are separate, run game logic timers that use the same duration as the animations, but only have game logic ...


1

I'd look into spring systems first before diving straight into fluid dynamics. They can help building a somewhat stable cell structure, and you can visualize this with normal effort (e.g. using alpha-blended particles, iso-lines, image-based effects on top of convex hulls etc..) Fluid dynamics and final-element simulations are of course much more realistic ...



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