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Im using libgdx particle system for a snow effect here's the draft file ,this will need some tuning but a good start. In this effect the png get some light blue tint. You can simply import it ParticleEffect snowEffect = new ParticleEffect();<br> snowEffect.load(files.internal("snow_effect"), [files.internal("particle.png")][2]);<br> ...


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Personally, I'm no real fan of "cripled" or ad-riddled "lite" versions of games and other tools. How about you don't worry about this for now. If you'd like to give your game away for free to build a fanbase, try out the whole process, test new things, and possibly establish your own setting/game world/community, go on and do so. Don't worry about earning ...


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You can change the price at any time, or make it free if you like. Also, you have the option of uploading your app under a different name. This is done often as demo/pro versions, where one is free and the other is paid.


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If you mean by view the screen size / viewport , you could use the ScreenViewport function of libgdx.. ScreenViewport (LibGDX API)


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Apple's guidelines are very strict. Relevant points include: Apps utilizing a system other than the In-App Purchase API (IAP) to purchase content, functionality, or services in an App will be rejected Apps offering subscriptions must do so using IAP, Apple will share the same 70/30 revenue split with developers for these purchases, as set forth ...


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In my experience with android, it is the garbage collection the kills the performance, not the allocation, although these two are tied hand and hand. As mentioned on the comments, pre-allocation is a way to deal with this issue. This is known as a memory pools. Another similar solution is object pool pattern. An object pool allocates as needed, but does ...


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The items spawned want to be objects with intrinsic position properties and a move method that can be called every frame or every set update to change the objects position downwards. As these are instantiated you can set up the y position such that they start just above the viable screen, and use a RandomNumber*screenwidth to determine the random x ...


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you problem is with the following call: glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, pObj->Meshes[x]->vertices.size()); you need to pass in the amount of vertices you are drawing aka pObj->Meshes[x]->vertices.size() / 3


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I got this working. Adding these two lines in my rendering function DrawFrame() : glEnableVertexAttribArray(gvPositionHandle); glVertexAttribPointer(gvPositionHandle, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0, 0); solved it.


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The script does the same using Vector3.Lerp and at a constant speed regardless of the distance between the two points.. using UnityEngine; using System.Collections; public class TapToMove : MonoBehaviour { //flag to check if the user has tapped / clicked. //Set to true on click. Reset to false on reaching destination private bool flag = false; ...


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The degree of access you are expecting may or may not be doable. However there is a simple callback function designed for sending messages from native plugins back to Unity: UnitySendMessage(). That will call the named method on the named object; in other words, you need to have an object with the desired method in the scene and then your plugin can call ...


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I think you need to figure out why this is happening. Can you reproduce the behavior by creating a daemon app and letting it run in the background? Do other games respond the same way exactly? If not then why is your game slowing down so dramatically is the question and it's a debug question. If you let the game continue as normal, it will probably highly ...


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Of course if other apps are being installed while the user is playing your game it will lag. I don't think there's anything you can do about that since it is a function of the Android settings and not your game. Usually other apps do not take much processing power away from the current visible app. Maybe you personally have too many aggressive apps on your ...


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There are two possibilities, as far as I know: Draw your geometry using one of the GL_LINE* topologies: GL_LINE_STRIP, GL_LINE_LOOP, GL_LINES. Use a fragment shader and some math to define the wireframe on-the-fly, without changing the topology. See this very nice example using WebGL: Wireframe display with barycentric coordinates.


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A (triangular) face is created using tree or more vertices. An aiModel contains a list of all vertices in the model and a list of faces. Each aiFace contains the indices to vertices that make up this (triangle) face. An index is the position in the list of vertices where the vertex we want is. Here is some pseudo code that retrieves the thee vertices of the ...


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Here are some things to try out: Try doing a Reimport All. Do you have any duplicate modues ? (like two modules for In-app billing plugins). Getting rid of the surplus one entirely should solve it. When I ran into this recently, it seems to be caused by using a JAR which references classes.jar for android. It seems that I must reference the ...


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The exact answer to this is going to be pretty specific to the way you've designed things. Essentially the strategy is to make the AI use the same methods that the player does. It shouldn't just run everything in a single tight loop. Break the AI's decisions and actions into discrete parts. Then, using something like a decision tree or behaviour tree ...


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The difference between html5 games and native games is a vast discussion, one that im not going to be able to answer in just one post. So the closest thing i can come to a straight answer is : It depends on the game. This stems from that both technologies are fairly new, and growing exponentially. As far as I know, no game studio have tried making the same ...


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Get information (dimensions, coordinates) of two imageviews, then use rectangle intersection condition. Assume that two rectangles A, B with coordinate of top-left and buttom-right as follow: Rectangle A: (Xa1, Ya1) ; (Xa2, Ya2) Rectangle B: (Xb1, Yb1) ; (Xb2, Yb2) Overlap condition: ((Xb1 - Xa2)(Xb2 - Xa1) <= 0) && ((Yb1 - Ya2)(Yb2 - Ya2) ...


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Refer the below site for some guidance: http://www.kilobolt.com/day-4-collision-detection-part-1.html It explains bounding shapes that will be used to check for collision. In the case of our robot, we will be using four bounding rectangles. I will suggest to give more specific requirement so that I can update my answer more helpfully.


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You need to go through steps and be careful at few steps as well while publishing app on play store. Refer this link for more details: http://developer.android.com/tools/publishing/publishing_overview.html


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You should be able to use Rect.intersects(Rect, Rect), like this example: Rect myViewRect = new Rect(); myView.getHitRect(myViewRect); Rect otherViewRect1 = new Rect(); otherView1.getHitRect(otherViewRect1); Rect otherViewRect2 = new Rect(); otherView2.getHitRect(otherViewRect2); if (Rect.intersects(myViewRect, otherViewRect1)) { // Intersects ...


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There's two things needed to solve this: Use a method called letterboxing. Build your game for one aspect ratio (16:9 works best for Android devices) and fill everything outside it with background image. Some developers just use black color, but background image is much nicer. Once you got that, find all the resolutions you want to support and draw ...


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Yes, it is absolutely possible. Fill rate is not such a problem because mobile graphics chips are designed to deal with very high resolution screens. In fact, deferred rendering helps with this because your lighting calculation is independent from scene complexity, so overdraw doesn't cause a slowdown. Here is my implementation on a fourth generation ...



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