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16

Some general inspiring approaches to create puzzles: One possible inspiring method is to use puzzle classifications. Adventure UML (Visual representation) Adventure UML (Source article) Mark Newheiser's classification "Making Better Puzzles" by Stephen Granade All these classifications can be used to stimulate your creativity and brainstorming. TRIZ - "a ...


12

I noticed that English isn't your first language. That's okay, it's my second language too. ;) What I would advise is to keep everything about your game in English. It's easier to port English to Danish than in reverse. Somebody else can extend your code if she knows English. You can outsource translations and resource creation to somebody else (who may ...


10

Your may find it easier to use if you reverse the selection order. So the user clicks a noun and then the game displays the set of verbs that can be performed on that noun. If the verb requires an object (i.e. "give to ___", then the game waits for the user to select the object before performing the action. Something like: User clicks a cheeseburger. Game ...


10

Sounds kind of like a directed graph problem. Start at the beginning, for each branching in the story record the items you currently have and then branch the graph. From there follow each branch and do the same, once you get to another branch record your current items and branch the graph. This will end up with a pretty dense graph with lots of duplicated ...


9

If you're not completely wedded to C#, then the "more standard" way of doing this is to use one of the many text adventure creation tools which already exist to help people make exactly this kind of game. These tools give you an already-functioning parser, handling for death, save/restore/undo, character interaction, and other similar standard bits of text ...


8

Graphic adventure games of the type you describe were never made multiplayer for one main reason: By the time computer networking was ubiquitous, the graphic adventure game genre was already dead. The few graphic adventures still being made were being made as niche games for a niche audience, they intentionally weren't breaking new design ground. Yes, ...


7

I think what you need in this case is the State Design Pattern. Instead of having multiple instances of each game object, create a single instance, but encapsulate its behavior in a separate class. Create multiple classes, one for each possible behavior, and give all classes the same interface. Associate one to your game object (the initial state) and, when ...


6

The only examples I can think of stretch your definition a bit. Uru Live (Myst Online) is an undead MMO adventure game in the Myst series. It gives players their own instances of puzzle worlds, but some worlds require or benefit from players working together. Zork: Grand Inquisitor has a co-op mode where one player controls the player character and the ...


4

I won't say it is impossible, I will say it seems impossible but I love the idea and you should definitely try it. I would start with duplicating the question on http://photo.stackexchange.com/ As for what techniques I would try: make a photo with a high contrast lightning, probably achieved by some back-light, e.g. a lamp hidden behind one of trees (or ...


3

JAVA is a perfectly viable language for creating an adventure game like Machinarium. All the tools are there. However if you haven't created a game before it might be a good idea to first get a good feel on how games are structured (code wise). Maybe follow a tutorial on creating text-based adventure like this one ...


3

Here is an analysis of Kickstarter projects for games 2012: http://www.slideshare.net/ICOPartners/kickstarter-and-games-september-2012 The final few slides provide a percentage split per game category, and interesting for you is a comment on slide 15 - "RPGs and Adventure games are still very much dominating" Edit: Another article ...


3

In SELEAG,we created a multiplayer engine for SCUMM based flash games: TIMEMESH. The idea was to create two teams of players which have to solve the same story but with slight variations. There are cross-bars in the adventure game. A cross-bar is a shared blocking between two teams playing a match. Until both teams have gone through 2 parallel challenges ...


3

I'm also working on a retro style RPG but rather than pixel perfect collision I am using circles and ellipses centered on the "feet" of my sprites. My world is made up of square environment tiles with some other shapes on top like tables, trees, and bookcases. These simple shapes are super cheap to collide, scale, and store and they give really nice ...


3

Experiment. Think about puzzle games you have played that come packaged with a level editor. How would you create a new puzzle using their tool? Usually by experimenting you can find interesting interactions between puzzle elements. Working backwards is also a very intuitive way to create puzzles of any sort. I would imagine this is the most common ...


3

An interesting way to design puzzles is through abstraction - look at objects around your home or elsewhere and think about how they interact with each other, how they can be manipulated and how they could benefit a goal or aim. Don't forget to think in three dimensions, as this will help with the design of the puzzle space. Puzzles can be about a whole ...


3

I prefer to design a situation, model it as accurately as I can, and allow as many standard manipulations as I can, and let problems and solutions emerge intrinsically and appropriately. Early examples included Infocom's Suspended and FTL's Dungeon Master, though they were a mix of scripted puzzle logic and semi-realistic game systems.


3

Adventure games rely heavily on the same motivations as readers or viewers of books or film. For this reason I'd recommend taking a look at the chapters on the section on the inciting incident and the principle of closing the action-expectation gap in Robert McKee's book Story: ...


2

As an adventure game developer (Eternally Us, McCarthy Chronicles) I've found that adventure gamers are generally split into 2 camps. Those who play for puzzles and those who play for interaction and story. Of course there is some overlap but it might be a good idea to establish your audience before thinking about puzzle design. Those who play for story ...


2

I present simplistic solution. It can be extended of course. I think simple list of (verb, object1, object2) would solve it: if player clicked object (verb) "use" and clicked object "balloon" and player clicked object "pump" and there exists triplet ("use", "ballon", "pump") then You "used ballon with pump" Sometimes object2 would be NULL like in "use ...


2

There probably is market research data available that one could use to draw correlations to a renaissance of the adventure game genre. Such data would hardly constitute proof, though. The best proof would be in the sales and profit/loss numbers directly from the publisher or developer (which aren't typically released, unless they are buried amidst the ...


2

What about using a observer pattern to look for milestone-changes? If a change happens, some class would recognize this and handle for example a change that has to be done to a npc. Instead of the mentioned state design pattern I would use a strategy-pattern. If a npc has n ways to interact with the character and m positions where he could be, there is a ...


2

The choices I would consider are either making the individual objects respond to different gamestates, or serve up different levels in different gamestates. The choice between those two would depend on what exactly I am trying to do in the game (what are the different states? how will the game transition between states? etc.) Either way however I wouldn't ...


1

It is possible to create an adventure based on real photos. The question which is better, comic/hand-drawn style or realistic, depends on the style and content of your game. Myst is a fairly old but also popular example of realistic adventure games. There are plenties of free solutions which helps you to create such a game. If you are interested in the ...


1

I hate to say it but the basic adventure games with those features that I know of are mostly just thrown together ad hoc, it's pretty basic programming following YAGNI principles. There are no diagrams, UML, or extensive documents except for the scripting language chosen and the interfaces the designers can use. I've never seen any, at any rate. That ...


1

Of course I can't say for sure since I haven't played all the games that there are in the world, but I seriously doubt that such a thing exists. I even doubt that it is viable. Here's why: A large part of the fun in these adventure games comes from figuring things out from beginning to end. If another player partially does that for you (because you just ...


1

There's two problems here: Interpretting the player's input into a syntax tree, then exectuing that tree. For the first stage, I'd have each verb button create a concrete verb instance derived from some verb interface. That instance would be passed further nouns or verbs for validation. If valid, it would attach the noun to its internal syntax tree, else ...



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