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1

It depends, if you want to build a city you can either do so procedurally (which also allows endless regeneration) or you can do so manually. But even if you do so manually you will likely want to duplicate a lot of things, for example you probably don't want to model each lamppost individually but instead keep one model for all of them. You can do the same ...


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They come from two different conventions for aligning the world axes. These conventions are known as Z-up and Y-up. Z-up In mathematics, engineering and most every field but computer graphics, the convention is for the X axis and Y axis to represent the ground plane and the Z axis to point up. Y-up When computer graphics was in its infancy, the X axis ...


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All 3D rotation must occur about some axis. That's what 3D rotation is. However, not all such rotation occurs about the Z axis. Rotation can be about any axis: X, Y, Z or an arbitrary axis not aligned with any of the principle axes of the coordinate system. What it sounds like you're referring to is the convention of rotating 2D shapes in a 2D plane about ...


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Given the option between "warping the cursor back to the middle of the screen every frame" or "constraining the mouse inside the game window", you always want to constrain the mouse within the window. With the "teleport the mouse to the middle of the screen each frame" approach, the mouse is actually not being constrained within the window; it's just ...


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You kind of summed up what you would have to do to create a ingame character creation screen. Supply different models for hair, face, and body. As for different colors, use a shader when drawing the model. The shader can make your skin color black, white, yellow or whatever stereotype color you would need. I feel like there is not much to say about this ...


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Finally, I found the geometric solution! I will share the code in JavaScript with three.js which is a 3d library, provides math stuff to JavaScript. var face = contactInfo.face, normal = contactInfo.normal, distance = contactInfo.distance, point1 = new THREE.Vector3(), point2 = new THREE.Vector3(), direction = new ...


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In case you're looking for a pure geometric solution and not a physics one, i.e. you're not using gravity so that the ball falls down basically on an inclined plane, then I suggest you look at it as finding the position of the center after the collision so that the ball is tangent to both the wall and the ground. Unfortunately I cannot make a fancy drawing, ...


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What you have here are two constraints that need to be resolved. On one hand, you need the sphere to stay outside the wall, by pushing it along the normal. On the other hand, you have the constraint that the sphere needs to stay attached to the ground. If you don't want to try writing fancy solvers, the easiest way to do this is to use an iterative solver. ...


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I'm now using openGL ES. I found it to be the most simple solution to my problem, since I don't need anything too advanced.


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There's no "better" solution here. You describe 2 different techniques, choosing between them is a design decision that depends entirely on the context and the intended effect. Locking the mouse with instant camera moves comes from FPSes, but I'm sure it has been used for other genres. It gives a very responsive and precise camera movement, but the down ...


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How exactly to make a 3D avatar customizable depends on the exact customizations desired (eg. change color? change clothing? change gender?) For example, changing color could mean swapping the texture used in the model's material. However the question about mounting objects is pretty straightforward... If the character has a skeleton (and if this is an ...


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Shaders in 3D art applications almost never have anything to do with shaders within the game engine. The parts of the model that carry over are fundamentals like the mesh geometry. That said, fairly standard stuff like an alpha channel in the texture (to make parts of the model transparent) usually operate the same way in both places. Alpha transparency and ...


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The cross product of two vectors is a vector orthogonal to them both. If you have two vectors contained in a plane, the cross product of them gives you the vector that is normal to that plane. Knowing that, you can construct your desired coordinate system by exploiting that property. Let's start finding two vectors defining your plane. For example, PQ ...


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For newcomers to this question, it looks like Microsoft has put up XNA installers for Visual Studio 2010/2012/2013. I haven't personally tested to make sure these work, but they might be worth a look: https://msxna.codeplex.com/releases/ EDIT: After running all included installers for the Visual Studio 2013 release (running VS 2013 Ultimate on my ...


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It really depends on the geometry that your world consists of and how you set your orthographic projection and camera up relative to that world. Most of the time, when people make 2D games with orthographic projections, they don't bother actually creating 3D geometry. Usually everything is a quad with a texture applied, or simple 3D geometry without much ...


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If using DirectX11.1 is feasible for you (it would mean restricting support only to Windows 7 and 8) you can pretty much do everything you want with Direct2D. In D2D it all comes down to simple DrawText("text", ...) calls. On GUIs, as part of an indie game I'm working on, I have built this D2D GUI library using SharpDX, which might you started on the right ...


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Figured it out mostly thanks to http://gamedeveloperjourney.blogspot.com/2009/04/point-plane-collision-detection.html Made me realize I had to verify the normal a bit closer, turns out my plane's grid was being rendered a little different than the actual coordinates for the verticles. No wonder this was so hard to get right! The pixel was projected ...


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If you watch the trees you can clearly see that a perspective camera is in use as it changes relative to the viewing angle. The fact that some things are drawn over other implies that a depth value is also in use so we have a 3D data set. Therefore, because there is a perspective camera being used to render a 3D data set it's likely that a standard 3D ...


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I'll assume that the A, B, C, D points really do lie on the same plane, i.e. that the two triangles form a single flat surface. The first step is to calculate the plane equation for the plane. If you don't know what that is, don't worry too much about it. It's a set of four numbers that specify the plane's location and orientation in space. It can be ...


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I suspect that there are several tricks in play. It is entirely possible that the game camera or view is a 3D perspective camera and all the sprites are placed in a 3D environment just at different heights. there could also be some clever parallax effects going on here. I would most likely suspect that this is in fact either a 3D or "2.5D" game or it is a ...


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A GPU works in screen-space coordinates which go from -1~1 for both x and y dimensions. The projection matrix (in combination with the view matrix) takes care of how 3D world coordinates are mapped onto two-dimensional screen space coordinates. If you use the same field of view and aspect ratio for each resolution the player will never see more (or less) ...


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Diverse terrain can be created using various arithmetic adjustments of randomly generated numbers. As I'm sure you realize, adjusting your generated values (for example, multiplying by two) would change the result you have. If you are familiar with programs such as Photoshop or Paint.net you've probably heard of the concept behind multiplying colors, or ...


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With new animation system, animations are handled by AnimatorController component. If your animation start automatically, it means that the clip is the default one (orange color) in the controller graph. To prevent this on Behavior on start you have 2 way: Keep AnimatorController component disabled until you don't need it. Use an empty state with no clip ...


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It seems that the title went from Animation to Animator which seems to indicate that you might need to look at a different menu. I found this in the unity manual. Perhaps look for an Animation menu.


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Any easy way to do this is to form your cloth to approximate the surface as many small spheres. This will work if you have a fairly good particle size to edge-length ratio. To avoid a silly N^2 collision detection algorithm you can use a simple implementation of spacial hashing. First lets talk about spatial hashing for a discrete point. You take it's ...



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