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1

I don't know about Unity 5, but in 4, you can click on your model in the Scene window. On the Mesh Renderer properties, there should be at least one material. To start, set the shader to "Diffuse", and click on "select" to select the texture. The character should appear textured. If you want to save these settings for future use, drag the object from the ...


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If you have to model that kind of effect in a 3d space such as on a planetoid you are going to need the system to respond to different camera angles and a sprite sheet just isn't going to work unless you pin two of the axis's which your description indicates isn't feasible. Depending on the game engine you are using, a particle system is going to be the ...


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You can always try tree[d]. It is an old program from frecle that allows you to create various trees. I believe the devs have stopped updating it and the download link is down. You can find it via the webarchive site here


4

This is entirely a matter of convention. (Since you didn't mention any particular tools.) But! If you are modeling in the same default orientation as your screen, which you say is right-handed, X-right, Y-up, and therefore Z-towards-you, then it would be natural to model your characters facing you, where forward is Z-positive. Which also implies your ...


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It is not that hard if you think about if for a while. Now the following assumes that you have perfect rectangles as faces in the OBJ. (I honestly don't know how to do arbitrary polygons.) I think you can build a orhtonormal R3 matrix from the values in the OBJ. You have 4 vertices: v 0.0 0.0 0.0 v 0.0 0.0 1.0 v 0.0 1.0 1.0 v 0.0 1.0 0.0 ...


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My lighting problem was caused by two things. 1.) My input layout's TEXCOORD was set to DXGI_FORMAT_R32G32B32_FLOAT instead of DXGI_FORMAT_R32G32_FLOAT. I suspect that this was behind the weird debug output I was seeing from my shaders, but I'm not sure. and 2.) My light was facing down the negative z axis, instead of the positive z axis. Either of these ...


1

You don't need anything special to do this. You can "up-convert" a Vector2 to a Vector3 with z = 0 by writing: (Vector3)shapeIn[p]; This will give you your shape in 3D, oriented in the XY plane (vertically, facing the default camera position you'd get for a new scene). (0, 0) in the source shape will map to (0, 0, 0) in the scene. You can now use all the ...


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I guess you could use a trail system much like the one provided for a similar problem:How to approach 360 degree snake without having it "slide" if you can get the transform of every point of your splines (all of them) you can then add them to a List and use the trail system to traverse them.


1

I would agree that it would be best to go fully 3D billboard with this. You can do this without shaders (well, you would use the built in BasicEffect which is an already written shader for you). Move the camera away from the scene and decrease the FOV. here's why: When you move the camera close to the scene and widen the FOV, the close fighter (blue ...


2

Its a guess but ... Maybe they just have a skybox behaviour where they track clicks to particular locations on each "quad" of the box. This basically means each "scene" is no more than 1 cubes worth of verts and indexes. Puts a lot of load on your artist though. You could test this by rendering a normal cube inside out and putting the camera inside it, ...


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This is entirely an issue of shader configuration. Without completely reiterating the workflow in the Unity manual, you'll probably want to apply the new Standard Shader and then, using the material charts, and adjust the material's parameters accordingly.


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I was seeing a similar issue. To investigate further I added an editor script like this, to log the vertices of the mesh I applied it to: using UnityEngine; using System.Collections; using System; [ExecuteInEditMode] public class TestScript : MonoBehaviour { void OnEnable() { Mesh mesh = GetComponent<MeshFilter>().mesh; ...


1

The first thing that comes to my mind would be to render your 3d graphics with a cel shader. I'm not too familiar with the technique, but basically, it makes your 3d models look cartoonish. I think some game companies put a lot of effort in this kind of technique to really give a nice look to their game and they really make it part of the artistic process. ...


3

You can do this in two ways, both of which require 3D cameras and projection: First, give all of your objects a 3D position in the world. // XYZ Vector3 Position; Next, create a camera with a position and orientation: class Camera { // Position of the camera in the world Vector3 Position; // Place where the camera is looking Vector3 ...


1

I think you should break this up into multiple questions and try again. Offhand, I see 3 questions that all warrant their own detailed answers, but there are probably more that you can ask to get the detailed answers you wish for: Using 3D to generate 2D Sprites You can just use 3D as a way to render Sprites, i.e. by creating your animations, then ...



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