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1. Creating textured model in Blender First, add a new texture by going to texture panel on the right. Select type "Image or Movie", click "Open" and locate your texture file. Then, move your mouse to the 3d view, press Tab to select the default cube, then press "U" and select Unwrap. Go to UV Image Editor: and select the texture: At this point, the ...


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Let's call the vertices of a single triangle v1, v2, v3, and the colours of those vertices c1, c2, c3. The general start to filling in your polygons is as follows: iterate over every pixel of your screen for every x/y coordinate calculate the barycentric coordinates b1, b2, b3 with respect to the triangle you are trying to draw. You can find formulas on ...


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I had a similar problem while trying to render a skybox. Mine was only a problem with .x files, but you might find some luck with this. It seems that the alpha is set to 0 on the rendering. My code inside the BasicEffect loop looked like this from XNA: currentEffect.LightingEnabled = false; currentEffect.PreferPerPixelLighting = false; currentEffect.World = ...


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Since it looks like your model is loaded correctly by the pipeline, this is the most barebones solution that should work to draw it(I've just tested it). It is built with VS2015 and the most recent MonoGame DirectX template using the standard blender cube. public class Game1 : Game { GraphicsDeviceManager graphics; private Model model; ...


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First, it won't solve your problem, but there are a few general problems with your code. The conditions for your if branch will always be true if transform.localEulerAngles.x >= 0 and <= 360. The > 270 part is redundant since if x is less than 270, it is still possible to be >= 0. If x is 0 and lookAxisX is > 0, then adding -lookAxisX will make x < ...


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They do whatever it takes to get the job done in the time allotted to the project. If that means working off of reference art or using existing assets that they have the legal right to use (licensing, etc.) then that's what they do. The kinds of schedules we pulled in game development pretty much required everyone to cut whatever corners necessary to meet ...


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I solved it! A friend of mine told me it's pretty standard if the material is not set to doublesided. (Or I could make a billboard out of it). But in code I had to add mat.side = Three.DoubleSide; Sorry guys for bothering you with this - it was probably quite basic but I'll leave it on just in case someone else encounters this problem!


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Assuming that you want to compute the position that an arbitrary 3D vertex (x,y,z,1) has on the view plane after the projection: You can use the given parameters to compute a projection matrix: where f = cotangent(fovy * 0.5) This is also the matrix that will be set by a call to gluPerspective. Then, you can multiply this matrix with your vertex to ...


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Your observation about the convex hull of intersection points still works in 3d & can be computed relatively quickly. You could simplify things by restricting the the orientation of the corridors. E.G. restricting to 90 degree turns reduces the 3d problem to a series of 2d problems.


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Yes, You can do this in very simple way by creating 3d Text/TextMesh for the text and Quads for images.


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This projection matrix should do the trick: .tg {border-collapse:collapse;border-spacing:0;} .tg td{font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;padding:10px 5px;border-style:solid;border-width:1px;overflow:hidden;word-break:normal;} .tg th{font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;font-weight:normal;padding:10px ...


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You can always try to use the clamp method: Ref: http://docs.unity3d.com/ScriptReference/Mathf.Clamp.html Example transform.localEulerAngles = new Vector3(Mathf.Clamp(transform.localEulerAngles.x, 0f, 90f), 0, 0); **This is just a push in the right direction (above is untested)


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As stated in the comments, drawing points is as simple as drawing GL_POINTS instead of GL_TRIANGLES, you'll need one vertex instead of three of course. Now to your non-structured input: Of course it is structured. It may not be in the format OpenGL expects, but it definitely has some sort of structure, some format you're able to parse. In case of a ...


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The simplest solution to this would be simply buffering the vertices into a VBO like you normally do, then rendering them as GL_POINTS instead of GL_TRIANGLES or GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP. This will give you a cloud of dots, that you can rotate the usual way with your vertex shader. If you want nicely sized circles, you should use a geometry shader to create a ...



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