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17

The Simple Way Add a quad which connects adjacent slices to each other. Texture this with a nice, melted cheese texture, complete with holes. As the slice is moved away the quad will naturally be stretched and thus stretch and skew the texture. This should look reasonable, although there will be no break. What to do here is make that texture an animated ...


6

No, it is not usually possible. But when it is, it’s quite useful. The problem is that there will always be two possibilities for the missing coordinate. For instance, if you store [x,y] as [0,0] this could mean the unit vector was either [0,0,1] or [0,0,-1] and without additional information there is no way to tell which of the two it was. Fortunately, in ...


3

I'm not entirely sure I understand the question but, given a 3D point cloud with a 2D "shape" (like a disc) the problem is simply one of dimension reduction. The algorithm you're looking for is called "Principal Component Analysis". How it works is not trivial, so I'll leave that for you to research if you're not already familiar with PCA. What it will give ...


3

Yes it's possible. Instead of using 3 cartesian coordinates [x, y, z] you can use 2 spherical coordinates [theta , phi] to represent any 3d unit vector. It depends on the case if it's useful or not. For example it can be useful for compressing animation data. There are also other representations you could use and there was actually an interesting paper ...


3

Luckily for you, you don't actually have to deal with any of this! Instead of actually creating a top-down world, you can use Unity's built-in 2D mode, and create sprites instead of cubes and planes, to make it look like it is top down. 2D mode makes the camera line up automatically, and have the depth appear to be non-relevant, though it is. Also, there are ...


2

The problem isn't particularly with the additive math. Contributions from multiple light sources is resolved by addition. We can clearly see that in the rendering equation. As we see in the equation light contributions is integrated over the unit hemisphere containing all possible values for all light directions(Wi). In real time computer graphics we only ...


2

I'd expect the conversion to be more like: static XMVECTOR XMConvertToQuaternion(XMFLOAT3 axis, float radian) { return XMVectorSet(sin(radian/2)*axis.x, sin(radian/2)*axis.y, sin(radian/2)*axis.z, cos(radian/2)); } in particular there is no need to push the coordinates through a cos and the w should be the last coordinate, there is a micro optimization ...


2

Using a preset animation: So create preset animation in a 3D modelling software like Maya/Blender which has features like soft bodies and cloth that can do a good job simulating the pizza tearing. Export both the pizza texture AND the model animation to Unity (probably as a set of .obj models or some such). The model animation will represent the cheese ...


2

In order to compute left and right, you need the concept of "up". For instance, if you are flying a spaceship and performing a "barrel roll" then the concept of "up" changes and with it, left and right change as well although you are facing in the same direction. Up can be based on the plain the character is standing on or simply be an absolute direction. ...


1

The source post says it all. http://www.ogre3d.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=41811 Blending in fake HDR is tough, because the frame buffer blend cannot cater for the exponent you're storing in the alpha channel Fake HDR, exponent, alpha channel. It only matters for a specific HDR format where, as mentioned above, .. "Fake" HDR, where the ...


1

@originalDaemon's answers are good! I think there is a middle way that may get better result than the first approach and will take a reasonable amount of effort (perhaps unlike "The Hard Way" approach). What I suggest is too actually model the cheese "web", it looks a lot like stalactites to me. Model a few pieces of stretchy cheese. Randomly position them ...


1

Do I use XMMatrixRotationQuaternion(XMVECTOR quaternion) and multiply the resultant Matrix with my scaling matrix and translation matrix to get my transformation matrix? I believe so. At least that's what I do with D3D9. (D3DXMatrixRotationQuaternion) You might already know but multiplication order should be : scalingMatrix * rotationMatrix * ...


1

For that orientation you described you want to use the following Euler rotations: //Camera (0, 0, 0) //Plane/quad (0, 0, 0) In this setup the x value will move the object "East" and "West". The Y position will move it "North" and "South" and the Z value will be "Altitude". It is worth noting that the coordinate axes in Unity are different from some ...


1

At some point in my time at e-on I have maintained the gizmos of Vue product line. I can tell you, it will take you multiple days, full time. Unless you find some library or super clever way, the classic way is to get the coordinate of the mouse in the window when you click, if its a relative coordinate to the viewport, you can simply divide x and y by width ...



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