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36

Using RTT (render-to-texture) allows to easily scale rendering quality (resolution, LOD, lighting complexity) for adjustable performance. RTT also makes it easier to replace the surface with a cubemap at a certain distance where it's hard to see the reflection exactly. Since the output is a texture, there are more options regarding what can be done with it ...


28

No, you are wrong - that's not how Duke Nukem 3D's mirrors worked at all. DN3D used a portal engine. A joint between any two sectors was arbitrary to an extent, and when the rendering engine came to a portal, it knew that it has to start rendering another sector in that. The sector behind the mirror was basically a place holder to deal with a quirk in the ...


4

I have little experience using Unity directly, but I've been a level designer for years and a much easier approach rather than worrying about cutting holes into your terrain is to simply build up a C shaped ridge in your terrain for the size of your cave and then cover it with rock meshes to give it the illusion of a cave. Another approach is that you ...


4

As I mentioned above, there won't be a perfect solution here, because the hexagons that make up a Goldberg polyhedron tend to be irregular and non-congruent with each other. From one part of the sphere to another they distort in different ways. In general there's no rotation that will align a regular source hexagon with a given tile perfectly. But, there ...


3

RTT would have been used if it was possible but the hardware rendering pipeline was one way. Older hardware also had limitations that prevented render to texture. Writing to RAM means it can not be read at the same time. To improve rendering performance the destination buffer was locked to write only, only the display hardware could read from it. You could ...


3

There are a couple ways to do this, but here's one way to do it. We can generate a rotation matrix by storing 3 normalized vectors as columns for a 3x3 matrix. The first column will be normalized vector pointing down our "X" axis, the second will be normalized vector pointing down our "Y" axis, and the final one will a normalized vector pointing down the "Z" ...


3

This question will probably be closed, but I want to provide you with some pointers anyway: I have done an OpenGL implementation of that article in question, back when the geometry stage was new. It was quite heavy to do, and then I was not constrained by an existing enginge but did my implementation from scratch. The article contains everything you need ...


2

glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW); glDisable(GL_LIGHTING); gluPerspective(50, 1.33, 1, 1000); gluLookAt(3, m_xAxisLocation, 4, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0); This kind of thing is generally wrong. What've you've done here is set the active matrix stack to the model-view stack; this is responsible for generating the matrix transform that will bring your rendered geometry into ...


2

Yes. Modern 3D graphics use a per-fragment (essentially, per-pixel) depth buffer to handle these scenarios correctly. Rendered geometry (your person, your windmill arm) passes through the transformation pipeline, ultimately arriving in screen space with a screen space depth (distance from the eye point) for every vertex. That depth is interpolated over the ...


2

The distortion in the video happens because they are mapping cubes on a sphere, which is geometrically impossible without distorting cubes. If you use any modern terrain engine or even a modeling program to model planets, you shouldn't face any kind of distortion. Edit for clarification: In the second statement, I am not talking about a voxel planet. It is ...


2

Think of your question in terms of tessellation with your sphere formed by rings. If you have a tessellation factor of 5, you will have a top cap, 2 middle sections, and a bottom cap. The bottom two tessellation ring being the 25% bottom cap and the top tessellation two rings the 25% top cap. The center is therefore one ring at the equator with a set of ...


1

Have you seen this post about getting the outer/edge vertices from a Mesh? http://answers.unity3d.com/questions/1019436/get-outeredge-vertices-c.html


1

Duke Nukem handle that by re-rendering the geometry behind the mirror, the other answers are partially correct. There are areas behind mirrors that actually contains no geometry (in game data files), the geometry is re-rendered at run time infact, the reason for those areas to exist is to avoid to place accidentally a piece of level there when editing the ...


1

Your question needs re-phrasing. SDL and OPENGL are two different technologies so to speak. Also, this question will lead to opinions instead of facts Wikipedia says: Simple DirectMedia Layer (SDL) is a cross-platform software development library designed to provide a low level hardware abstraction layer to computer multimedia hardware components. Open ...


1

The problem you are experiencing is called Gimbal Lock. There are some ways to circumvent this problem. One possibility is to use Quaternions. There are plenty of resources on the web about them so I won't go to deep into the details here. Quaternions are fast but not very intuitive for a 3D editor. But it is possible to convert Euler angles to Quaternions. ...


1

I had the same issue when I was attempting to make a model for a UAV in Blender and import it to unreal engine. I think I recall as a solution I just redid my bone weights and it fixed the problem. Then i rotated the model to go the direction I wanted to in unreal.


1

STL doesn't export coords so there isn't a work around. Unless the program exports directly to obj (I'm guessing it doesn't hence the workaround) or you can export the coords in another format, you're stuck having to redo the unwrap yourself. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STL_(file_format) "STL files describe only the surface geometry of a three-...



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