Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

In deferred shading all the material properties are rendered into the G-buffer, e.g. albedo, normals, roughness, metalness, etc. that are needed for BRDF evaluation. After this step shading is performed for pixels within light volumes using light and material properties as input to the BRDF. The problem with deferred shading is that more complex BRDF's (e.g. ...


3

Keep in mind I had this problem over 2 years ago and I have since moved onto Unity 3D. This is more of a conclusion than a solution. The main problem was that moving the bones did not move the mesh. I used Cinema 4D to model and rig the model and exported as fbx. There are many fbx export options in C4D and I tried many variants with no success. Here are ...


2

Check our approach. http://dsp.agh.edu.pl/en:research:rayav Developed library utilizes beamtracing to provide user with realistic audio auralization. All audio effects are computed based on the actual geometry of a given game level as well as its acoustic properties (acoustic materials, air attenuation). The sound changes dynamically along with movement of ...


2

This is generic solution that will work even with FFP: Sort models from far to near (in the example this is just a matter of 2 planes) Set blending to additive. Render opaque outline; Render half-transparent insides; Render outlines with half-transparent fading gradient; Render glowing dots sprites on the corners.


2

Three vertices are easy. Just place them in the same location as the three vertices of the clicked face. For the rest of this answer, we'll call these vertices v1, v2, and v3. To position the 4th vertex, first take the cross product of v1 → v2 and v1→ v3. (If this returns a vector pointing backward, just swap v2 and v3.) vUp = normalize(cross(v2 - v1, v3 - ...


2

A possible solution is to use the Dot Product. Of course, you need two vectors and not two angles, but I guess you're using them (otherwise I wouldn't explain how you're having 3D angles). Quoting Van Verth & Bishop from the book Essential Mathematics for Games & Interactive Applications, page 30-31: A more common use of the dot product is to ...


2

Deep within the game engine your mesh is defined by your vertices, your indices (which define how to draw the triangles using the vertices), and its material (which consists of the shader as well as other parameters). Submeshes allow you to define separate lists of indices and materials (depending on the engine) over the same vertex data which is useful not ...


1

To render just the edges of an arbitrary polygon you could use a Solid Wireframe technique. It uses barycentric coordinates to determine which edges to draw. For example you might have a triangle whose barycentric coordinates are (for each vertex) B0: (1, 0, 0) B1: (0, 1, 0) B2: (0, 0, 1). Put it simply, when these values are interpolated the further any of ...


1

referencing a video clip here i imagine there are a few things going on: not every bullet is being drawn with a "tracer" - just like you said in theory i think you could accomplish this effect rather simply, when firing bullets you could create every Nth bullet with a different type. you can have the visual appearance of that bullet be an illuminated ...


1

I would mention a few specific games (such as Stonehearth, which is where most of the Qubicle character images come from) but there are a ton of games, art (e.g. on DeviantArt), demos, movies, etc that use different styles. Hence, I suggest an image search. Search for voxel characters, blocky characters, and "qubicle" characters. (Yes, put "qubicle" in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible