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Whatever collision be, angular momentum is conserved. ie Iw = constant with the coefficient of restitution (in translation, i dont know if its said the same in rotation) u define, and with the moment of inertia, you should be able to figure it out. And i think this would similar to collisions in 1D, since only one axis is used :) Goodluck :)


3

It seems like what you're looking for is the Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance algorithm. The preceding paper is also worth a read. Although the paper may be a bit involved the theory behind the algorithm is fairly straightforward: Assume that you already have a simulation (game) with agents (units) that have some sort of bounding volume around them. ...


2

You're in luck. I did a full translation of Randy Gaul's 2D physics engine into C# and XNA. He hasn't really explained things well for beginners like me. For your answer, you should just multiply the cross product with the inverse of the inertia of the body. This is from my translation: angularVelocity += inverseInertia * Vector2D.Cross(contactVector, ...


1

Your density calculation is correct. Either the weight of the human is too much, or you have got to make the human bigger. In real life your human would have more volume or less mass. Which one to select is entirely up to you. And since this is top-down, you can expect to get the wrong density of the human with that formula. If it was a side view game, it ...


1

Thanks for asking Narek. I've struggled with understanding these joints in the past, and I'd like to use this answer to clear up some misconceptions. b2DistanceJoint This joint has two input parameters: frequency w, and damping d. Together they define the linear response of the connected bodies. Here I will always consider one body as the ground body (set ...



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