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Usually the term "2.5-D" refers to one of two very different styles of games. It could either mean: 1) A game that uses 2-D rendering techniques, but controls in 3 spacial dimensions. Usually uses graphical tricks to appear as though it were actually rendered in 3-D. This was very common in the 90s, but not so much today. (Examples: "DOOM", "Duke Nukem ...


27

The first game I'm aware of that had the term "2.5D" applied to it was Doom (although Wolfenstein 3D qualifies in some sense too). Wolfenstein 3D was a basically 2D game with a 3D presentation. You navigated a 2D maze, all the floors were flat, all the ceilings were at the same height, there were no windows, doors were floor-to-ceiling and opened sideways, ...


2

I am not sure what would be the more accepted definition, but I and the folks at my previous company considered "any game which looks like isometric 3D, but is rendered via 2D sprites" to be 2.5D. Now let me explain why we did that. Generally rendering a 3D world with a lot of objects in it will create too much pressure on the processing, lowering the FPS ...


2

2.5D is often another way of saying "isometric" -- 2D graphics drawn in a way to give the appearance of 3D, but not actually simulating 3D coordinates. See the wikipedia article on isometric graphics: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isometric_graphics_in_video_games_and_pixel_art The gist is that in 2.5D/isometric, you are still using a 2D coordinate system ...


11

2.5D 2.5D ("two-and-a-half-dimensional"), ¾ perspective, and pseudo-3D ar terms, mainly in the video game industry, used to describe either 2D graphical projections and similar techniques used to cause a series of images (or scenes) to simulate the appearance of being three-dimensional (3D) when in fact they are not, or gameplay in an otherwise ...


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The terms 2D and 3D (as you probably already know) refer to the number of spatial dimensions in a Euclidean world-space. This dimensionality must be an ordinal number; there is no such thing as a half dimension, so the term 2.5D is really a nonsense term, and has no intrinsic meaning. That said, 2.5 is "somewhere between" 2 and 3, so 2.5D generally means ...


3

The game screen shot you posted is a 3D game. In a 3D game, the objects are drawn using vertices to draw actual 3D objects, which are then colored, textured, so forth. In a 2D game, the objects are taken from sprites / sprite sheets, etc. The difference between the two is how you can view them. A sprite is like a flat piece of paper. You can not view it ...


6

2.5D is just a convienient way of saying 2D that looks 3D. I supose you could really blur the lines of the definition if, for example, you use a 3D engine but restrict gameplay to a 2D plane only, but personally I'd consider something 2.5D is it looks 3D but acts 2D.


2

Isometric games are indead games viewed from above, in such a way that the x, y and z axis are exactly 120 degrees from eachother. So an isometric game is a game viewed in an isometric projection: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isometric_projection (this source is very reliable :P). So as you have already guessed, it is about the way the game is drawn.



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