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I am interested in learning the class structure of Plants vs Zombies, particularly level design; for those who haven't played it - this video contains nice play-through: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89DfdOIJ4xw.

How would I go ahead and design the code, mostly structure & classes, which allows for maximum flexibility & clean development? I am familiar with data driven design concepts, and would use events to handle most of dynamic behavior.

Dissection at macro level:

  • (Once every Level) Load tilemap, props, etc -- basically build the map
  • (Once every Level) Camera Movement - might consider it as short cut-scene
  • (Once every Level) Show Enemies you'll face during present level
  • (Once every Level) Unit Selection Window/Panel - selection of defensive plants
  • (Once every Level) Camera Movement - might consider it as short cut-scene
  • (Once every Level) HUD Creation - based on unit selection

  • (Level Loop) Enemy creation - based on types of zombies allowed

  • (Level Loop) Sun/Resource generation
  • (Level Loop) Show messages like 'huge wave of zombies coming', 'final wave'
  • (Level Loop) Other unique events - Spawn gifts, money, tombstones, etc

  • (Once every Level) Unlock new plant

Potential game scripts:

a) Level definitions: Level_1_1.xml, Level_1_2.xml, etc.

Level_1_1.xml :: Sample script

<map>
   <tilemap>tilemapFrontLawn</tilemap>
   <SpawnPoints> tiles where particular type of zombies (land vs water) may spawn</spawnPoints>
   <props> position, entity array -- lawnmower, </props>
</map>

<zombies>
   <... list of zombies who gonna attack by ids...>
</zombies>

<plants>
   <... list by plants which are available for defense by ids...>
</plants>

<progression>
   <ZombieWave name='first wave' spawnScript='zombieLightWave.lua' unlock='null'>
      <startMessages time=1.5>Ready</startMessages>
      <endMessages time=1.5>Huge wave of zombies incoming</endMessages>
   </ZombieWave>
</progression>

b) Entities definitions: .xmls containing zombies, plants, sun, lawnmower, coins, etc description.

Potential classes:

//LevelManager - Based on the level under play, it will load level script. Few of the //               functions it may have:
class LevelManager
{
 public:
   bool load(string levelFileName);
   bool enter();
   bool update(float deltatime);
   bool exit();

 private:
   LevelData* mLevelData;
}







// LevelData - Contains the details of level loaded by LevelManager. 
class LevelData
{
   private: 
      string file;

      // array of camera,dialog,attackwaves, etc in active level
      LevelCutSceneCamera** mArrayCutSceneCamera; 
      LevelCutSceneDialog** mArrayCutSceneDialog;
      LevelAttackWave** mArrayAttackWave;

        ....
      // which camera,dialog,attackwave is active in level
      uint mCursorCutSceneCamera; 
      uint mCursorCutSceneDialog;
      uint mCursorAttackWave;


   public:
      // based on cursor, get the next camera,dialog,attackwave,etc in active level
      // return false/true based on failure/success
      bool nextCutSceneCamera(LevelCutSceneCamera**);
      bool nextCutSceneDialog(LevelCutSceneDialog**);          
}


// LevelUnderPlay- LevelManager 
class LevelUnderPlay
{
   private:
      LevelCutSceneCamera* mCutSceneCamera;
      LevelCutSceneDialog* mCutSceneDialog;
      LevelAttackWave* mAttackWave;
      Entities** mSelectedPlants;
      Entities** mAllowedZombies;

      bool isCutSceneCameraActive;

   public:
      bool enter();
      bool update(float deltatime);
      bool exit();
}

I am totally confused.. :(

Does it make sense of using class composition (have flat class hierarchy) for managing levels.

Is it a good idea to just add/remove/update sprites (or any drawable stuff) to current scene from LevelManager or LevelUnderPlay?

If I want to make non-linear level design, how should I go ahead? Perhaps I would need a LevelProgression class, which would decide what to do based on decision tree.

Any suggestions would be appreciated very much.

Thank for your time,

lalan

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1 Answer

This is a very open-ended question and you'd be better off asking one clear top-level question and then following it up with several more focused detail questions afterwards. But I'll try and sum things up.

How would I go ahead and design the code, mostly structure & classes, which allows for maximum flexibility & clean development?

There isn't One True Way to write code. People can give you their opinions here but they will differ significantly. If you're not familiar with coding yet, then you need to start with smaller projects than this. If you are familiar with coding in other contexts, then whatever rules for good development you used before will still apply here.

Potential game scripts:

Note - typically a 'script' in game development refers to code written in a programming language, to perform some sort of logic. What you were describing are actually just data files.

Does it make sense of using class composition (have flat class hierarchy) for managing levels.

If you like. Or have a hierarchy. It makes no difference to the outcome, only to what you have to go through to make it. Great games have been written using both methods. You shouldn't be considering a component based system unless you know you need components though. The program structure should follow the requirements of the game.

If I want to make non-linear level design, how should I go ahead?

You have to define what you mean by "non-linear level design" first.

The problem with most of this is not that it's confusing, but that you don't have clear specifications. Once you have clear specifications, it becomes clear what code you need. Once you know what code you need, it's obvious where most of it has to go, especially if you're familiar with good coding practices and typical design patterns.

All your other questions are really just asking for opinions which will vary from person to person and nobody can give you the right answer, especially not without seeing which classes you have and what they all do - but if you had a list of classes, you would probably know what to do in the first place.

For all these decisions - just pick one, and code it. If you find yourself wishing you'd done it the other way, refactor it later.

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Hey Kylotan,Thanks for the answer. I am working on to refine it. Will post again once I have concrete questions. thanks for taking your time. –  lalan Mar 7 '11 at 22:50
    
+1 "The problem with most of this is not that it's confusing, but that you don't have clear specifications." –  jhocking Jun 10 '11 at 15:26
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