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We are a team of 4 trying to develop a browser based MMORPG. Its partially text based in a way like Might and Magic. The world map would be in 3D and actions would be automatically resolved. The game involves a lot of exploring. We are mainly design students and don't have much of a technical background. So our first choice to develop this game was Unity3D. Would like some advice on creating browser based game and game engines that can handle server-client interactions. Also, our game is centered around players creating communities and groups. The game should allow players to do so. While this is not our primary concern now, I would simply like to get some direction in terms of creating a browser based MMORPG.

Edit: Sorry for asking such a broad question, I will try to ask more specific questions

  1. What technology can I use to build the client? Will simple HTMl/JS will do? How would Java work? Can I use XNA also to deploy to the web using Silverlight?

  2. On the server side, what kind of software should we be looking to use? Will a linux box with LAMP work well? If I am using Unity3D can I communicate to an SQL database?

  3. What kind of bandwidth am I looking at for roughly 100 users? The server will have to synchronize player position, chat, and events like quest completion and skill unlocking.

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closed as not a real question by Josh Petrie, Joe Wreschnig, Ricket Oct 18 '11 at 18:32

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Welcome to the site. Unfortunately this question is overly broad and discussion-oriented, and not a great fit for the specific, directed Q&A that this site is geared for. To avoid having your question closed, perhaps you could edit it to be more about a very specific problem you're facing? Or, if you'd just like to have a discussion, you could join our chat –  Josh Petrie Oct 18 '11 at 15:13
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That said, there are a few related questions that you may want to peruse -- you can see them on the "Related" sidebar to the right of this question. –  Josh Petrie Oct 18 '11 at 15:14
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As badp wrote in the comment of your previous question on Gaming.SE, it's best to be specific instead of asking for generic "advice" or "directions". Join the chat if you want that, otherwise try to ask specifics - which technology to use, how should the infrastructure look like, how to hook up victims ... errm, I meant, players, and in general any problems you encounter with the game systems you try to implement. –  Martin Sojka Oct 18 '11 at 15:21
    
Suggestion: Split up your question into several ones (though research other questions about MMOs first, obviously). More chances for good and exhaustive answers, more reputation and badges too if you care about Skinner boxes. ;) –  Martin Sojka Oct 18 '11 at 19:36

1 Answer 1

I assume since you're students, you are building this as a class project. Please let me first suggest that you scale back your ambitions. Making games is hard, making good games is harder still. I HIGHLY recommend that you and your team

  1. Greatly reduce your design. If you have a short timeframe and have to learn everything as you go, you will run into problems and it will be hard to get anything done.
  2. Think single player first. Making a multi-player game is tricky and will most likely require some programming to get working. In general multi-player must be thought of and designed for early on, but I recommend your first game be a single player one.
  3. Stay motivated and ask specific questions you have here when you get stuck. If you have a specific question and you show how you have tried to solve it on your own, its very likely someone on this site will be able to assist you.

The main point, is that multiplayer is hard to do, so I recommend you work on your game design skills in a single player environment. Then if you are wildly successful, maybe try adding multiplayer and/or start a new game with client/server architecture from the getgo.

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This is a good point- High hopes are great, but unfortunately most large projects like this go unfinished. (maybe not most, but that's the trend I've seen) –  ultifinitus Oct 18 '11 at 16:40
    
The game is going to be a prototype, and well the game is a multiplayer only browser game. I understand the vast scale of this project, however it is a learning experience for all (and we dont have the fear oof failing really , no money involved ;) ) –  maverick340 Oct 18 '11 at 18:59
    
@ultifinitus You had it right the first time: "Most" –  John McDonald Oct 19 '11 at 13:56

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