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hey so I've decided to Code my own 2D soft-body physics engine in C++ since apparently none exist and I'm starting only with a general idea/understanding on how physics work and could be simulated:

by giving points and connections between points properties such as elasticity, density, mass, shape retention, friction, stickiness, etc.

What I want is a starting point: resources and helpful examples/sites that could give me the specifics needed to actually make this such as equations and required physics knowledge. It would be great if anyone out there also would give me their attempts or ideas.

finally I was wondering if it was possible to...

  • use the source code of an existing 3D engine such as Bullet and transform it to be 2D based?

  • use the source code of a 2D Rigid body physics engine such as box2d as a starting point?

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-1 Are those rhetorical questions, or do ou really think there is a reason why you couldn't use those engines as a starting point? Of course you can, not sure what you are asking though. As it stands the question is vague and too broad. –  Maik Semder Jun 28 '11 at 18:07
    
You basically just asked this. –  The Communist Duck Jun 28 '11 at 18:51
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3 Answers

You should start with the basics of tensors. A soft body is but an instance of a continuous environment. So, each point is subbject to a deformation matrix, depending on the local tension, such as traction, pressure, and shearing. It's a complex matter. For the computational cost is to be insured at each phisical itteration. It's makeable, but should be made by a powerful processor in real time. by the way, I'm working on such a project, but I sheat on the physics. My feature is a round bactery subject to a reduced gravyity. So I emulate the deformations with morphing, shearing matrixes and scaling. The algoritmics is way harder, but it runs alright on an I5 with 1M RAM graphic card. The art of video game is illusion, not a real simulation.

But if you provide an open source soft body engine, you would make me way happier :-)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuum_mechanics

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You should start with the basics of tensors. A soft body is but an instance of a continuous environment. So, each point is subbject to a deformation matrix, depending on the local tension, such as traction, pressure, and shearing. It's a complex matter. For the computational cost is to be insured at each phisical itteration. It's makeable, but should be made by a powerful processor in real time. by the way, I'm working on such a project, but I sheat on the physics. My feature is a round bactery subject to a reduced gravyity. So I emulate the deformations with morphing, shearing matrixes and scaling. The algoritmics is way harder, but it runs alright on an I5 with 1M RAM graphic card. The art of video game is illusion, not a real simulation.

But if you provide an open source soft body engine, you would make me way happier :-)

http://nsm08.casimages.com/img/2013/10/29//13102902452516445711683639.gif

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This does not answer the question. The question was too poorly constructed to be answerable anyway, but this does not improve it. –  Seth Battin Oct 29 '13 at 4:52
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