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I want to parse Blender-Made Files directly into my homemade Lisp program. I've been pulling data out of .X3D files manually. Is this the best format to focus on writing a parser for?

Thanks!

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Josh Petrie Jan 2 at 18:58

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Get a LISP library which will do it for You. –  user712092 Jul 10 '11 at 13:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Write an exporter. No, really.

That way you can output exactly the data you need in the format you want.

When you start from one of the existing plugins, it's actually quite easy.

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I would have never thought of that! I could dump it into lisp code directly and skip the middleman. Also, great example of answering my need, instead of just the question. –  WarWeasle Jul 22 '10 at 16:11

The .obj is of course the easiest to to parse, but if you need something a little more powerful (with animations) then get the .md2 file format.

link text

If I can dig up some of my code from high school I might be able to find a md2 loader I wrote.

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I think a custom blender exporter will get items into my code faster. I appreciate offer for your code however. –  WarWeasle Jul 22 '10 at 16:15

Milkshape (MS3D) format was quite easy to implement a reader for, in C++ and C#. Here's the spec I used:

http://chumbalum.swissquake.ch/ms3d/ms3dspec.txt

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The easiest to load is OBJ (which is human readable), others are horribly complex.

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I've always found OBJ files easiest to parse, but they tend to be large because they're "human readable." However, they're public and standardized.

If you need it, the Obj Specification:

http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/dataformats/obj/

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Link looks dead, suggestion: martinreddy.net/gfx/3d/OBJ.spec –  fableal Apr 26 '13 at 17:18

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